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Adele Diamond, PhD, FRSC
Canada Research Chair Tier 1 Professor
of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience





















 

Fellow, Royal Society of Canada (2009- )

Canada Research Chair Tier 1
Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience (2004- )
Dept. of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia (UBC)

Head, Division of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience,
Dept. of Psychiatry, UBC (2008- )

Founding Member, CIRCA (Centre for Interdisciplinary Research and Collaboration in Autism) at UBC (2010- )

Founding Fellow, Institute of Mental Health, UBC (2006-)

Member,

Graduate Program in Neuroscience,

Undergraduate Program in Cognitive Systems,

The Brain Research Centre

the Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP)

Child and Family Research Institute

BC Mental Health and Addictions Research Institute (BCMHARI)

NeuroDevNet, a Network of Centres of Excellence (NCE) dedicated to helping children overcome neurodevelopmental disorders

Faculty Fellow, Green College at UBC (2007-2009)

Contact Info

For general lab inquiries please e-mail: info@devcogneuro.com
Phone: 604.822.7220
Fax: 604.822.7232
E-mail: adele.diamond AT ubc.ca

Address:
   Prof. Adele Diamond
   Canada Research Chair in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
   Department of Psychiatry
   University of British Columbia (UBC)
   2255 Wesbrook Mall,  Room G842    
   Vancouver, BC   V6T 2A1 
   Canada

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Research Interests

Prof. Diamond’s lab integrates developmental, cognitive science, neuroscience, and molecular genetic methods to study prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the most complex cognitive abilities ('executive functions' [EFs]) that rely on PFC and interrelated brain regions. EFs include being able to 'think outside the box' and see things from other perspectives (cognitive flexibility), mentally relating different ideas and facts to one another (working memory), and giving a considered response rather than an impulsive one, resisting temptations, and staying focused (inhibitory control, including selective attention). These abilities are crucial for problem-solving, creativity, and reasoning, and for success in all life's aspects.

One goal of the lab is to examine fundamental questions about how PFC and EFs are influenced by biological factors (such as genes and neurochemistry) and by environmental factors (including detrimental influences such as poverty or stress and facilitative ones such as interventions). For example, the lab examines ways in which unusual properties of the PFC dopamine system contribute to the exceptional sensitivity and vulnerability of PFC and EFs to environmental and genetic variations that have little effect elsewhere in the brain, and how at least some of these effects are different in men and women. The lab is also interested in diverse activities that have been shown to improve children’s EFs, including traditional martial arts, yoga, mindfulness, and certain school curricula.

The importance of social, emotional, and physical health for cognitive health is nowhere more evident than with PFC and EFs. PFC and EFs are the first to suffer, and suffer disproportionately, if anyone is sad, stressed, lonely, sleep-deprived, or not physically fit. One's intellect, emotions, social needs, and body are interrelated. Traditional activities that have been part of all cultures throughout time (e.g., dance, music-making, play and sports) address all these aspects of a person -- they challenge our EFs (requiring focus, concentration, and working memory), make us happy and proud, provide a sense of belonging, and help our bodies develop. Most recently Prof. Diamond has turned her attention to the possible roles of music, dance, storytelling, and physical activity (even circus) in improving executive functions, academic outcomes and mental health.

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Significant Contributions

1. In the 1980s,Adele Diamond’s work opened up a new field of inquiry, Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, and marked a milestone in the integration of developmental psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience.

Developmental psychologists and neuroscientists used to know little of one another’s work. As a graduate student, Diamond realized that for 50 years developmental psychologists and neuroscientists had been using essentially the same behavioral task without knowing it. Developmental psychologists called it “A-not-B” and used it to study cognitive development in infants; neuroscientists called it “delayed response” and used it to study the functions of prefrontal cortex (PFC) in monkeys.

Building on that insight, she undertook a systematic program of research to chart the developmental progression of human infants on A-not-B and delayed response plus a transparent barrier task (to obtain converging evidence from a very different paradigm), the developmental progression of infant monkeys on the 3 tasks, the effect of lesions on adult monkeys' performance of those tasks, and the effect of lesions on infant monkeys' performance of the tasks (see Table below).

Behavioral Tasks:
A-not-B
Delayed Response
Object Retrieval
Human infants show a clear developmental progression from 7½ -12 months. Diamond, 1985 Diamond & Doar, 1989 Diamond, 1988
Adult monkeys with lesions of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex fail. Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1989 Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1989 Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1985
Adult monkeys with lesions of posterior parietal cortex succeed. Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1989 Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1989 Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1985
Adult monkeys with lesions of the hippo-campal formation succeed. Diamond, Zola-Morgan, & Squire, 1989 Squire & Zola-Morgan, 1983 Diamond, Zola-Morgan, & Squire, 1989
Infant monkeys show a clear developmental progression from 1½ -4 months. Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1986 Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1986 Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1986
5-month-old infant monkeys, who received lesions of dorsolateral prefontal cortex at 4 months, fail. Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1986 Diamond & Goldman-Rakic, 1986  

This established the first strong link between early cognitive development and the functions of a specific brain region. That gave encouragement to others that rigorous experimental work addressing brain-behavior relations was possible in infants. It also fundamentally altered the scientific understanding of PFC early in development; clearly it was not silent as accepted wisdom had held. Even though PFC is very immature early in life and takes a very long time to develop, it can already subserve elementary versions of the highest cognitive functions during the first year of life. Diamond went on to facilitate many of the earliest collaborations between developmental and cognitive scientists, on the one hand, and neuroscientists on the other.

2. In the 1990s, Diamond’s team made two discoveries that led to worldwide improvements in the medical treatment for phenylketonuria (PKU), improving the lives of thousands of children. Dr. Diamond identified the biological mechanism causing EF deficits in children treated for PKU. She provided the first demonstration of a visual deficit in treated PKU children (which changed international guidelines for the age of treatment onset).

After demonstrating that maturation of PFC played a role in early cognitive development, a natural next question was, “What’s changing in PFC to make these cognitive advances possible?” Diamond hypothesized that at least part of the answer was increasing levels of dopamine in PFC. But how to study the role of dopamine in modulating PFC cognitive functions (“executive functions [EFs]) in humans early in life? No one had ever done anything like that. Again, the answer lay in integrating two fields. Researchers and clinicians working on inborn errors of metabolism had noticed that children ‘well-treated’ for phenylketonuria (PKU) seemed to show selective EF deficits, but no one could imagine a mechanism that could explain that, so reports of such deficits were largely ignored. Neuropharmacologists studying the mesocortical dopamine system in rats had shown that if there is only a modest reduction in the dopamine precursor, tyrosine, PFC is selectively affected. Diamond realized that the latter might provide a mechanism to account for the former because children ‘well-treated’ for PKU typically had slightly elevated blood levels of phenylalanine (Phe) and slightly reduced blood levels of tyrosine. Since Phe and tyrosine compete to enter the brain, a modest elevation in the Phe to tyrosine ratio in blood would result in a modest reduction in the amount of tyrosine reaching the brain – a reduction sufficient to impact PFC but too small to impact other brain regions.

To test that hypothesis, Diamond again turned to work in both humans and animals. Diamond’s team studied children and animal models, combining neurochemical and behavioral work in animals --creating the first animal model of treated PKU along the way -- with longitudinal testing of an extensive battery of neurocognitive tasks in infants and children. They were thereby able to demonstrate the mechanism causing the deficits that had so confounded those working in inborn errors of metabolism, and to demonstrate that the deficits could be prevented by stricter dietary restrictons.

Midway through, Diamond learned that the dopamine system in the retina shares the same unusual properties as those that cause PFC to be sensitive to reductions in available tyrosine too small to affect other brain regions. To be consistent, she had to predict that retinal function would also be adversely impacted in children treated for PKU, so she ventured into vision science to investigate that. Sure enough, her team identified the first visual deficit reported in children treated for PKU – impaired contrast sensitivity. Two superficially unrelated behavioral effects (a selective cognitive deficit and a selective visual deficit) were found to have same underlying cause. Diamond’s team went on to discover a long-lasting visual deficit if children with PKU are not started on diet within days of birth (the norm had been to start them within 2 weeks of birth).

Diamond, A., Ciaramitaro, V., Donner, E., Djali, S., & Robinson, M. (1994). An animal model of early-treated PKU. Journal of Neuroscience, 14, 3072-3082

Diamond, A. & Herzberg, C. (1996). Impaired sensitivity to visual contrast in children treated early and continuously for PKU. Brain, 119, 523-538.

Diamond, A., Prevor, M., Callender, G., & Druin, D.P. (1997). Prefrontal cortex cognitive deficits in children treated early and continuously for PKU. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development (Monograph #252), 62 (4), 1-207.

Zagreda, L., Goodman, J., Druin, D.P., McDonald, D., & Diamond, A. (1999). Cognitive deficits in a genetic mouse model of the most common biochemical cause of human mental retardation. Journal of Neuroscience, 19, 6175-6182.

Diamond, A. (2000). Recent research findings on the effects of age at diet initiation on the visual system. Invited presentation at the NIH Consensus Development Conference on “Phenylketonuria (PKU): Screening and Management,” Bethesda, MD, 16 October 2000.

On the basis of this presentation, US national guidelines for when dietary treatment for PKU should begin
changed from by 14-21 days of age to "as soon as possible, and no later than 7-10 days after birth."

Diamond, A. (2001). A model system for studying the role of dopamine in prefrontal cortex during early development in humans. In C. Nelson & M. Luciana (Eds.), Handbook of developmental cognitive neuroscience (p. 433-472). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Reprinted (2002) in Reader in brain development and cognition. Blackwell Press.

see also: www.apa.org/research/action/pku.aspx

The presentation of our data at the NIH Consensus Conference on PKU, led to the new recommendation for US national health policy. On the basis of this presentation, US national guidelines for when dietary treatment for PKU should begin changed from by 14-21 days of age to “as soon as possible, and no later than 7-10 days after birth.”

Diamond, A. (2000). Recent research findings on the effects of age at diet intitation on the visual system. Invited presentation at the NIH Consensus Development Conference on “Phenylketonuria (PKU): Screening and Management,” Bethesda, MD, 16 October 2000.

Scientific results are rarely perfectly neat and clean. It’s true that children with PKU whose Phe levels were mildly elevated were impaired on all 6 of the tasks that required working memory plus inhibition, but they performed well on 3 other tasks that also tax working memory (two self-ordered pointing tasks and one temporal order memory task). There’s solid evidence that those 3 tasks also depend on PFC. Diamond had predicted that performance on all tasks dependent on PFC would be impaired in PKU children with mildly elevated Phe levels. Why on earth were they not impaired on these 3 tasks? She had no clue. But again she was unwilling to let the inconsistency remain uninvestigated. Those investigations uncovered that while self-ordered pointing depends on PFC, it is not sensitive to the level of dopamine in PFC and hence is not affected in children with PKU. Those investigations also began a line of research, adding techniques in molecular genetics to her arsenal, leading to:

3. In the 2000s, Diamond’s team made two discoveries that are changing our understanding of the dopamine system in PFC.

An opportunity arose to further test whether self-ordered pointing was really insensitive to variations in PFC DA levels. The best way to clear released dopamine with the dopamine transporter protein. PFC is unusual in that it has very little dopamine transporter. Unlike other brain regions, PFC has to rely on the COMT enzyme to clear dopamine. For persons of European origin, they are as likely to have a version of the COMT gene that codes for a fast-acting COMT enzyme, leaving less DA in PFC (i.e., valine [Val] at codon 158) as they are to have a version of the COMT gene that codes for a sluggish COMT enzyme, leaving more DA around longer in PFC (i.e., methionine [Met] at codon 158).

Diamond’s team obtained the first evidence of the relation of polymorphisms of the catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) gene to EF performance in children, providing an existence proof that differences in genotype can be related to differences in cognition in normal children. Their results challenged accepted notions that since DA is important for some PFC-dependent cognitive functions, it is important for all (since as predicted, COMT genotype was unrelated to self-ordered pointing performance). The differential sensitivity of distinct cognitive abilities to specific neurotransmitters opened up possibilities for targeted pharmacological interventions.

Diamond’s team obtained evidence of a gender difference in which polymorphism of the COMT gene is more beneficial for EF. Dr. Diamond and her team hypothesize that women may have higher baseline levels of dopamine in prefrontal cortex (an optimum level) and males.

If Dr. Diamond’s hypothesis about why her team found that gender X COMT gene interaction in older adults was correct (i.e., that estrogen is mediating it), one should see an even stronger interaction in younger adults, since those women have estrogen circulating in their bodies. Diamond’s team tested young adults (ages 19-35) homozygous for the Met or Val version of COMT. Within genotype, half the women were tested first when their estrogen levels were high (midluteal menstrual phase) and then when their estrogen levels were low (follicular phase), and half with the reverse order. Men were tested at comparable intervals. Groups were matched for demographics and IQ. As predicted, when estrogen levels were high, women homozygous for the Val version of COMT showed better EF than females homozygous for Met; men showed the standard result (better EF with the Met-Met version of COMT). During the menstrual phase when estrogen levels are low, females showed the male pattern of better EF by those with the Met-Met COMT genotype. The effect of COMT genotype on EF was found for EF tasks sensitive to the level of dopamine in PFC, but NOT for self-ordered pointing, a task previously shown to be insensitive to the level of dopamine in PFC.

The significance of these findings include: (1) The potential for direct practical applications: It has implications for gender and menstrual-phase differences in the optimal dosage levels of drugs that affect PFC dopamine. Women might need lower dosages than men, at least when their estrogen levels are high. (2) The long-revered Yerkes-Dodson curve (that performance on difficult cognitive tasks is better if one is slightly aroused, slightly stressed) may apply more to males than females, and the advisability of intentionally imposing mild stress to improve performance might need to be reconsidered. (Women in general do not need stress to perform optimally, while mild stress [as per Yerkes-Dodson] is often beneficial to men’s performance.)

Diamond, A., Briand, L., Fossella, J., & Gehlbach, L. (2004). Genetic and neurochemical modulation of prefrontal cognitive functions in children. American Journal of Psychiatry, 161, 125-132.

Diamond, A. (2007). Consequences of variations in genes that affect dopamine in prefrontal cortex. Cerebral Cortex, 17, 161-170.

Evans, J. W., Fossella, J., Hampson, E., Kirschbaum, C., & Diamond, A. (2009, May). Gender differences in the cognitive functions sensitive to the level of dopamine in prefrontal cortex. Presented at the Association for Psychological Science (APS) annual meeting, San Francisco, CA.

4. Diamond (2005) demonstrated that ADHD with & without hyperactivity appear to be different disorders,ith different genetic & neural bases, cognitive profiles, responses to medication, & patterns of comorbidity, resonated deeply. Websites on ADHD-inattentive soared from 4 to 1,000’s. The Founder and Head of the Dutch ADD Assoc. (Stichting ADD Nederland), Karin Windt, wrote:

“Dr. Diamond changed millions of lives by giving this quiet, invisible group the acknowledgement they had been waiting for so long. For the first time we were heard and finally understood. In the past 5 years, the number of websites on ADD has increased from 4 to thousands. Dr. Diamond has touched many lives by writing her article…. Many people with attention deficits have great talents, often a high IQ, and are innovative and creative. How-ever, they are seen as daydreamers who cannot concentrate well. In the old days we would be called stupid or lazy….Through her work we are now able to explain to others why ADD is so different from ADHD. This question remained unanswered until her article appeared in 2005."

Diamond, A. (2005). ADD (ADHD without hyperactivity), a neurobiologically and behaviorally distinct disorder from ADHD (with hyperactivity). Development and Psychopathology, 17, 807-825.

5. Diamond’s team has obtained findings with direct and important implications for education.The Diamond et al. (2007) Science paper, showing that the early childhood school curriculum, Tools of the Mind, improves children’s EFs and that the better children’s EFs paper the better their performance on standardized measures of academic performance, ignited worldwide interest. Their findngs were significant because they indicated that: (1) EFs can be improved in 4-5 year olds Some had thought that too early to try to improve EFs. (2) EFs can be improved in regular public-school classes, without expensive, high-tech equipment or 1:1 attention and by regular public-school teachers. (3) A program that emphasized dramatic play produced better EFs (and others showed better academic outcomes) than one that devoted more time to direct academic instruction (indicating that play may aid academic goals rather than take time away from achieving them). (4) If throughout the school-day EFs are supported and progressively challenged, benefits generalize and transfer to new activities, such as our the Diamond's team's EF measures, which were different from anything the children had done before. (Daily EF ‘exercise’ may aid EF development and thus be beneficial for our mental health, much as physical exercise improves our bodies and is beneficial for our bodily health.) This was the first study to demonstrate that EFs can be improved even in very young children in regular public-school classes by regular teachers. It was the first to demonstrate that EFs would be improved in young children without computerized training – indeed they found far stronger results than have any computerized training studies with young children.

James Griffin, Chief of the Child Development and Behavior Branch of NICHD, pronounced at a conference that the Diamond et al. (2007) study was responsible for an explosion of interest both by funders & researchers in the possibility of intervening early to improve EFs to head off mental health problems and school failure and to give children a better chance in life. Indeed, the study has affected early education worldwide.

The Diamond & Lee (2011) Science paper, reporting that surprisingly diverse approaches have been shown to improve children’s EFs, has generated even more interest. “Brain-based” doesn’t mean immutable or unchangeable. EFs depend on the brain, yet exercising and challenging EFs improves them, much as physical exercise hones our physical fitness. Yet transfer is never wide; to get diverse benefits, diverse skills must be directly trained and practiced.

Diamond, A., Barnett, W.S., Thomas, J., & Munro, S. (2007). Preschool program improves cognitive control, Science, 318, 1387-1388.

Diamond, A. (2010). The evidence base for improving school outcomes by addressing the whole child and by addressing skills and attitudes, not just content. Early Education and Development, 21, 780-793. NIHMS249662
UN Committee on the Rights of the Child has circulated this to all its members.
Margaret Nkrumah of Ghana has circulated it among African leaders

Diamond, A., & Lee, K. (2011). Interventions shown to aid executive function development in children 4-12 years old. Science, 333, 959-964. PMID:21852486

Diamond, A. (2012). Activities and programs that improve children’s executive functions. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21, 335-341.
Appeared in Psychology Progress (Dec. 9, 2012) (which alerts the scientific community to breaking journal articles considered to represent the best in Psychology research)

Diamond, A. (2014). Want to optimize executive functions and academic outcomes? Simple, just nourish the human spirit. In P. D. Zelazo & M. D. Sera (Eds.), Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology: Developing Cognitive Control Processes: Mechanisms, Implications, and Interventions, 37, 203-230. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Diamond, A. (in press). Why improving and assessing executive functions early in life is critical. In P. McCardle, L. Freund, & J. A. Griffin (Eds.), Executive Function in Preschool Age Children: Integrating Measurement, Neurodevelopment and Translational Research. Wash., DC: American Psychological Association.

Diamond, A. & Ling, D. (accepted). Fundamental questions surrounding efforts to improve executive functions (including working memory). To appear in M. Bunting, J. Novick, M. Dougherty, & R.W. Engle (Eds), An integrative approach to cognitive and working memory training: Perspectives from psychology, neuroscience, and human development. Oxford University Press.

6. Diamond’s team has demonstrated ways to help children succeed at tasks long thought beyond their ability.

We have tried to demonstrate the principles that (a) sometimes we declare a child as failing to grasp something because of our own error in the way we queried the child (we did not ask in a way the child could understand or that allowed the child to demonstrate the mastery he or she has) and (b) sometimes a child who cannot grasp something when it is taught one way can readily grasp it when it is presented a different way (thus we as educators need to be awry about giving up and need to have faith in the potential of each child to succeed), E.g.:

Diamond, A. & Gilbert, J. (1989). Development as progressive inhibitory control of action: Retrieval of a contiguous
object. Cognitive Development, 4, 223-249.

Diamond, A. (1995). Evidence of robust recognition memory early in life even when assessed by reaching behavior. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 59, 419-456.

Diamond, A. & Lee, E.-Y. (2000). Inability of 5-month-old infants to retrieve a contiguous object: A failure of conceptual understanding or of control of action? Child Development, 71, 1477-1494.

Diamond, A., Kirkham, N.Z., & Amso, D. (2002). Conditions under which young children CAN hold two rules in mind and inhibit a prepotent response. Developmental Psychology, 38, 352–362.

Kirkham, N.Z., Cruess, L. & Diamond, A. (2003). Helping children apply their knowledge to their behavior on a dimension-switching task. Developmental Science, 6, 449-467.

Diamond, A., Carlson, S.M., & Beck, D.M. (2005). Preschool children’s performance in task switching on the dimensional change card sort task: Separating the dimensions aids the ability to switch. Developmental Neuropsychology, 28, 689-729.

7. Diamond’s team cut by more than half the age at which infants can demonstrate the ability to deduce abstract rules with important implications for improving outcomes for children with autism.

Our work with the delayed nonmatching to sample (DNMS) paradigm strongly suggested that the critical late-maturing competence required for normal infants’ success on DNMS is the ability to grasp the relation between stimulus and reward when there is no obvious physical connection between them (Diamond, Churchland et al. 1999; Diamond, Lee, & Hayden 2003; Diamond 2006).

On each DNMS trial, a new sample object is presented; the subject displaces it to retrieve a reward. After a delay, the sample and a novel object are presented; choice of the novel object is always rewarded. Hence, the subject needs to deduce the rule to always go to the new (non-matching) object.

Children generally do not succeed at DNMS, even with delays of only 5 or 10 sec, until they are almost 2 years old (~20-21 months; Diamond, 1990; Diamond et al., 1994; Overman, 1990; Overman et al., 1992). Since robust recognition memory is present well before 21 months, the late emergence of success on DNMS must be due to the late emergence of another ability. Indeed, when a child first succeeds on DNMS with a 5-sec delay, that child performs comparably at delays of 30 and 60 sec in the same session (Diamond et al., 1994). The problem children have is in understanding what correct performance entails, not retention at long delays.

In a Velcro condition, we attached the reward (still a separate object in its own right) to the base of the stimulus. The stimuli were still presented atop wells, and the rewards were still out-of-sight in the wells, but instead of the reward remaining in the well when a stimulus was displaced, the reward moved with the stimulus. In this condition, where the rewards were physically connected to (though detachable from) the stimuli, most infants of 9 or 12 months succeeded at the 5-sec training delay and continued to perform comparably at the longer delay (30 sec; Diamond et al., 1999). Thus, when the reward and stimulus were physically connected, the task was easy for infants.

Diamond hypothesized that children with autism might have a similar problem- grasping the conceptual connections between physically unconnected things. She predicted that by physically connecting items that are meant to be conceptually connected, some children with autism would be able to grasp concepts and understand connections that had eluded them. Thus, her hypothesis was that children with autism (even preschoolers with mild developmental delays) ARE capable of deducing abstract rules (such as same or different) if there is a direct, physical connection between stimuli and rewards. Most behavioral training with children with autism or developmental delays has not considered whether it matters if cue and referent are physically connected. It would be wonderful if making such a simple change could enable these children to grasp concepts previously thought to be beyond their ability.

We found, as predicted, that about twice as many children with autism succeed in the Velcro (physically attached) condition as in the standard DNMS condition.

Further, if children are primed with pretest trials where no reward objects are used (as in Diamond, 1995), children with autism consistently pick the novel object on those pretest trials and then go on to succeed at the standard DNMS protocol where they are again always to pick the novel object (Herman et al. 2010).

Diamond, A. (1995). Evidence of robust recognition memory early in life even when assessed by reaching behavior. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology (Special Issue [Guest Editor, Nora Newcombe]), 59, 419-456.

Diamond, A., Churchland, A., Cruess, L., & Kirkham, N. (1999). Early developments in the ability to understand the relation between stimulus and reward. Developmental Psychology, 35, 1507-1517.

Diamond, A., Lee, E-Y., & Hayden, M. (2003). Early success in using the relation between stimulus and reward to deduce an abstract rule: Perceived physical connectedness is key. Developmental Psychology, 39, 825-847.

Diamond, A (2006). Bootstrapping conceptual deduction using physical connection: Rethinking frontal cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 10, 212-218.

Herman, D., Mass, C., Landa, R., and Diamond, A. (May 20, 2010). Performance by children with ASD, developmental delay, and typical development on delayed non-matched to sample task. Poster presentation, International Meeting for Autism Research (IMAR), Philadelphia, PA.

8. Adele Diamond’s work has fundamentally changed the way people think about cognitive development. Before, all the focus had been on how new skills and insights are acquired during development. Diamond demonstrated that development proceeds not only by the acquisition of new skills and knowledge but also by the increasing ability to inhibit habitual reactions that get in the way of demonstrating what is already known. It is not enough to know the right thing to do, you must do it, and sometimes an inability to inhibit inappropriate reactions gets in the way. It had been widely assumed that naturally if you knew what you should do you would do it. Diamond demonstrated that between knowing the correct response and implementing it, another step, long ignored, is often required. When a strong competing response is present, inhibition of that response is required. Diamond demonstrated that the biggest challenge for young children is not memory (they have excellent memories) but inhibitory control (resisting temptations and not acting impulsively). Adults tend not to appreciate how much of challenge this is for children because it is so much less of a challenge for us.

We tend to think cognition is ‘higher’ and later-maturing and that motor is ‘lower’ and earlier-maturing. However, motor development shows as long a period of development as cognitive skills. Often the motor skills are the limiting factors and the later to mature, rather than the cognitive skills, as Diamond has demonstrated. People had not realized until her work that motor development and cognitive development, far from being independent, are fundamentally intertwined. Her work served to build bridges between two fields that had rarely talked, cognitive science and motor science.

Diamond, A. & Gilbert, J. (1989). Development as progressive inhibitory control of action: Retrieval of a contiguous object. Cognitive Development, 4, 223-249.

Gerstadt, C., Hong, Y., & Diamond, A. (1994). The relationship between cognition and action: Performance of 3½-7 year old children on a Stroop-like day-night test. Cognition, 53, 129-153.

Diamond, A. (2000). Close interrelation of motor development and cognitive development and of the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex. Child Development, 71, 44-56 (Special issue: New directions for Child Development in the 21st Century.)

Diamond, A. & Lee, E.-Y. (2000). Inability of 5-month-old infants to retrieve a contiguous object: A failure of conceptual understanding or of control of action? Child Development, 71, 1477-1494.

Diamond, A. (2009). When in competition against engrained habits, is conscious representation sufficient or is inhibition of the habit also needed? Developmental Science, 12, 20-22.

Shing, Y.L., Lindenberger, U., Diamond, A., Li, S-C., & Davidson, M.C. (2010). Memory maintenance and inhibitory control differentiate from early childhood to adolescence. Developmental Neuropsychology, 35, 679-697.

Simpson, A., Riggs, K.J., Beck, S.R., Gorniak, S.L., Wu, Y., Abbott, D., & Diamond, A. (2012). Refining the understanding of inhibitory processes: how response prepotency is created and overcome. Developmental Science, 15, 62-73. Epub 2011 Nov 28.

9. Dr. Diamond demonstrated that the cognitive biases we think so odd in children are still present in adults:

Diamond, A. & Kirkham, N.Z. (2005). Not quite as grown-up as we like to think: Parallels between cognition in childhood and adulthood. Psychological Science, 16, 291-297.

10. The international translational conference series (called ‘Brain Development and Learning’) that Prof. Diamond created in 2006 and still organizes & hosts (with no salary compensation) is significant in educating the public about scientific findings and providing evidence to help people make informed decisions in caring for children. The series clearly taps an important need. People find these conferences extremely valuable, and come from ALL over BC, almost every Canadian province, almost half of the US states, and many other countries, including 15-20 First Nations click here

The purpose of the conference series is to be of service to the community -- to highlight successful, innovative programs and present important scientific findings in neuroscience, child development, and mental health in ways that parents, doctors, teachers, social workers, and others can understand, see the immediate relevance of, and USE. It has a ripple effect, as those attending the meeting bring what they learned back to their communities and organizations and educate others. This is truly a conference series devoted to closing the research-practice gap to help all children thrive.

These are not your typical scientific conferences, where scientists talk to scientists. We set a tone where learning goes in both directions, not just from speakers to audience. The conferences have been beloved in part because of their ‘feel’ - a comfortable, grounded, relaxed atmosphere of mutual respect and feeling of community. One of the best aspects of the conferences are the informal interactions between presenters and conference attendees).

Comments from participants include: “This conference is better than the best that I can imagine.” “The speakers are exceptional, the organization of the conference is supreme, the spirit of the whole conference is great; this is the best conference I ever attended.” Attendance doubled in 2008 and doubled again in 2010; 99% of the 755 attendees at the 4th conference in 2013 rated it outstanding (as did 99% of the 638 attendees of the prior conference in this series)! Many attendees say the conferences are life-changing.
Dr. Diamond works very hard with potential applicants from Third World countries to obtain a Canadian visitor visa so that they can attend the Brain Development and Learning Conference. In July 2013, 11 of the 12 people she helped were able to obtain visas. People from over 30 countries attended the conference. Her greatest success story was making it possible for the only child and adolescent psychiatrist in Gaza, Dr. Sami Owaida, MD, to attend the 2013 Brain Development and Learning Conference.
see:
www.straight.com/life/404381/vancouverites-unite-help-palestinian-doctor-attend-brain-development-conference
and/or
bdlconference.wordpress.com/2013/06/17/vancouverites-of-all-stripes-unite-to-help-a-palestinian-doctor-attend-this-summers-conference/

11. As a committed teacher, Prof. Diamond contributes through teaching and dedication to her students, and continues to teach at UBC though it is not required of her and she does not get paid for it. Students always rate her course as the very best in their university experience. They also say the course has changed their lives. For example,

“This course profoundly shaped my experience and I would recommend it to absolutely every person, regardless of year, faculty, or degree of interest in psychology. I can affirm that I am not only a better, more well-rounded student after taking this course, but an enriched human being. This was a life-altering course.”

12. As a research mentor, Dr. Diamond contributes through the trainees who have gone on to their own independent accomplishments, such as

Amber Story, PhD - Program Director, Program Director, Social Psychology, Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences, Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Science, National Science Foundation (NSF)

Ruth Litovsky, PhD - Associate Professor, Communicative Disorders, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison. (Ruth has made a major discovery in the assessment children’s auditory attention, for which a patent is pending.)

Susan Rivera, PhD - Associate Professor, Center for Mind and Brain, Univ. of California-Davis

Elizabeth Donner, MD - Assistant Professor of Neurology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto

Natasha Kirkham, PhD - Lecturer in Psychology & RCUK Fellow in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Dept. of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck College, Univ. of London

Dima Amso, PhD - Assistant Professor, Brown Univ

Melissa Goldberg, PhD - Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine

Matt Davidson, PhD - Assistant Professor, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst

Kristin Shutts, PhD - Assistant Professor, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

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Current Research Projects - click here.

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Publications

Ciesielski, K.T., Fischl, B., Goldsmith, T.E., Busa, E.A., Kerwin, A.A., Diamond, A., Levin, E., van der Kouwe, A., Rosen, B.R. (submitted). Multivalent development of cortical thickness in dorsal and ventral visual networks. Neuropsychologia.

Diamond, A. (submitted). Developmental progression in learning, and executing from memory, sequential hand movements: Children's performance on Luria's "Flat-Fist-Edge" motor sequence task.

Diamond, A., Lee, C., Senften, P., Lam, A. & Abbott, D. (submitted). Is required testing or less playtime really required for excellent academic results: Lessons from the first evaluation of Tools of the Mind outside the US. Psychological Science.

Schonert-Reichl, K. A., Oberle, E., Diamond, A., Lawlor, M. S.*, Abbott, D., Thompson, K., & Oberlander, T.F. (accepted). Accelerating cognitive and social emotional development through a simple-to-administer school program. Developmental Psychology. (Special Section on Mindfulness and Compassion in Human Development.)

Diamond, A. & Ling, D. (accepted). Fundamental questions surrounding efforts to improve executive functions (including working memory). To appear in M. Bunting, J. Novick, M. Dougherty, & R.W. Engle (Eds), An integrative approach to cognitive and working memory training: Perspectives from psychology, neuroscience, and human development. Oxford University Press.

Diamond, A. (in press). Why improving and assessing executive functions early in life is critical. In P. McCardle, L. Freund, & J. A. Griffin (Eds.), Executive Function in Preschool Age Children: Integrating Measurement, Neurodevelopment and Translational Research. Wash., DC: American Psychological Association.

Diamond, A. (2014). Executive functions: Insights into ways to help more children thrive. Zero to Three, 35, 9 - 17. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2014). Editor of Special Issue, Perspectives on Language and Literacy. (special issue on executive functions) (pdf)

Diamond, A.  (2014). Understanding executive functions: What helps or hinders them and how executive functions and language development mutually support one another. The International Dyslexia Association: Perspectives on Language and Literacy, Spring 2014, 7-11. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2014). Whether coordinative (soccer) exercise improves executive functioning in kindergarten children has yet to be demonstrated. Experimental Brain Research. doi: 10.1007/s00221-014-3920-2 PMID:24728129 (pdf)

Zarchi, O., Diamond, A., Weinberger, R., Abbott, D., Carmel, M., Frisch, A., Michaelovsky, E. , Gruber, R., Green, T., Weizman, A., & Gothelf, D. (2014). A comparative study of the neuropsychiatric and neurocognitive phenotype in two microdeletion syndromes: Velocardiofacial (22q11. 2 deletion) and Williams (7q11. 23 deletion) syndromes. European Psychiatry. [Epub 17 Sept. 2013 ahead of print] PMID: 24054518 (abstract) (pdf)

Wright, A. & Diamond, A. (2014). An effect of inhibitory load in children while keeping working memory load constant. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 1-9. (Special issue on Development of Executive Function during Childhood). doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00213. PMID:24672502 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2014). Want to optimize executive functions and academic outcomes? Simple, just nourish the human spirit. Minnesota Symposia on Child Psychology, 37, 203-230. (pdf) NIHMS605270
This paper, not the whole volume, to be reprinted in 2015 in a book in Portuguese.

Weikum,W. M., Grunau, R. E., Brain, U., Chau, C. M. Y., Boyce, W. T., Diamond, A., & Oberlander, T. F. (2013). Prenatal serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressant exposure and serotonin transporter promoter genotype (SLC6A4) influence executive functions at 6 years of age. Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, 7, 1-12. PMID: 24130516 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2013). Executive Functions. Annual Review of Psychology, 64, 135-168. [Epub Sept 27, 2012 ahead of print] PMID:23020641; NIHMS602706 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2012). Activities and programs that improve children’s executive functions. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 21, 335-341. NIHMS602709 (abstract) (pdf)
Appeared in Psychology Progress (which alerts the scientific community to breaking journal articles considered to represent the best in Psychology research)

Diamond, A. (2012). How I came full circle from the social end of psychology, to neuroscience, and back again, in an effort to understand the development of cognitive control. In R. F. Subotnik, A. Robinson, C. M. Callahan, & P. Johnson (Eds.), Malleable Minds: Translating Insights from Psychology and Neuroscience to Gifted Education, 55-84. Storrs, CT: The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, U. of Conn. (pdf)

Simpson, A., Riggs, K.J., Beck, S.R., Gorniak, S.L., Wu, Y., Abbott, D., & Diamond, A. (2012). Refining the understanding of inhibitory processes: how response prepotency is created and overcome. Developmental Science, 15, 62-73. [Epub Nov 28, 2011 ahead of print]. PMID:22251293; NIHMS393793 NIHMS393793 (abstract) (pdf)

Green, T., Weinberger, R., Diamond, A., Berant, M., Hirschfeld, L., Frisch, A., Zarchi, O., Weizman, A., Gothelf, D. (2011). The effect of methylphenidate on prefrontal cognitive functioning, inattention, and hyperactivity in velocardiofacial syndrome. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 21, 589-595. PMID:22149470 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Lee, K. (2011). Response. In Mercer, J., Martial arts research: weak evidence [Letter to the editor]. Science, 334, 310-1. PMID:22021838 (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Lee, K. (2011). Interventions shown to Aid Executive Function Development in Children 4-12 Years Old. Science, 333, 959-964. PMID:21852486; NIHMS310326 (abstract) (pdf)
see also: Supplemental material
Reprinted in German in Sabine Kubesch (ed., 2014), Exekutive funktionen und selbstregulation: Neurowissenschaftliche grundlagen un transfer in die pädagogische praxis (pp. 145-161). Bern, Switzerland: Verlag Hans Huber AG. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2011). Biological and social influences on cognitive control processes dependent on prefrontal cortex. Progress in Brain Research, 189, 319-339. (special issue entitled “Gene Expression to Neurobiology and Behavior: Human Brain Development and Developmental Disorders”) PMID:21489397; NIHMS602710 (abstract) (pdf)
Reprinted in German in Sabine Kubesch (ed., 2014), Exekutive funktionen und selbstregulation: Neurowissenschaftliche grundlagen un transfer in die pädagogische praxis (pp. 19-47). Bern, Switzerland: Verlag Hans Huber AG. (pdf)

Shing, Y.L.T, Lindenberger, U., Diamond, A., Li, S-C., & Davidson, M.C. (2010). Memory maintenance and inhibitory control differentiate from early childhood to adolescence. Developmental Neuropsychology, 35, 679-697. NIHMS249666 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2010). The evidence base for improving school outcomes by addressing the whole child and by addressing skills and attitudes, not just content. Early Education and Development, 21, 780-793. PMID:21274420 NIHMS249662 (abstract) (pdf)
     - UN Committee on the Rights of the Child has circulated this to all its members.
     - Margaret Nkrumah of Ghana has circulated it among African leaders.

Diamond, A. (2009). Apprendre à apprendre, Dossier de La Recherche, 34, 88-92. NIHMS93334 (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2009). The interplay of biology and the environment broadly defined. Developmental Psychology, 45, 1-8. NIHMS89168 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2009). All or none hypothesis: A global-default mode that characterizes the brain and mind. Developmental Psychology, 45, 130-138. NIHMS89169 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2009). When in competition against engrained habits, is conscious representation sufficient or is inhibition of the habit also needed? Developmental Science, 12, 20-22. NIHMS85959 (abstract) (pdf)

Blair, C. & Diamond, A. (2008).  Biological processes in prevention and intervention: Promotion of self-regulation and the prevention of early school failure. Development and Psychopathology, 20, 899-911. NIHMS77373 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Amso, D. (2008). Contributions of neuroscience to our understanding of cognitive development. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17, 136-141. NIHMS46856 (abstract) (pdf)
Reprinted in (2010), MDExplorer, a new Serbian journal focusing on biomedicine.

Diamond, A. (2008). Response: In Mercer, J., Minding controls in curriculum study [Response to letter]. Science, 319: 1185 - 1186. [Letter to the editor]. PMID:18309062 (pdf)

Diamond, A., Barnett, W.S., Thomas, J., & Munro, S. (2007). Preschool program improves cognitive control. Science, 318, 1387-1388. PMID:18048670 ;NIHMS36247 (abstract) (pdf)

  • Reported in numerous news outlets, including New York Times, Chicago Tribune, the UK Telegraph, BBC, & NPR
  • Ignited an explosion of interest by funders & researchers in the possibility of intervening early to improve EFs

see also: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/magazine/27tools-t.html & also: http://www.devcogneuro.com/images/Pubs/National_Scientific_Council_on_the_Developing_Child2009.pdf

Diamond, A. (2007). Consequences of variations in genes that affect dopamine in prefrontal cortex.  Cerebral Cortex 17, 161-170. NIHMS38403 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2007). Interrelated and interdependent. Developmental Science, 10, 152-158. NIHMS16727 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2006). Bootstrapping conceptual deduction using physical connection: Rethinking frontal cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 10, 212-218. NIHMS10332 (abstract) (pdf)

Munro, S., Chau, C., Gazarian, K. & Diamond, A. (2006). Dramatically larger Flanker effects (6-fold elevation). Presentation, Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA., 164. (pdf)

Davidson, M.C., Amso, D., Anderson, L.C., & Diamond, A. (2006). Development of cognitive control and executive functions from 4-13 years: Evidence from manipulations of memory, inhibition, and task switching. Neuropsychologia, 44, 2037 - 2078. NIHMS9720 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2006). The early development of executive functions. In E. Bialystok & F. Craik (Eds.), Lifespan Cognition: Mechanisms of Change (pp. 70-95). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. (pdf)

Diamond, A., Carlson, S.M., & Beck, D.M. (2005). Preschool children's performance in task switching on the dimensional change card sort task: Separating the dimensions aids the ability to switch. Developmental Neuropsychology, 28, 689-729. NIHMS9706 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2005). ADD (ADHD without hyperactivity), a neurobiologically and behaviorally distinct disorder from ADHD (with hyperactivity). Development and Psychopathology, 17, 807-825. NIHMS9705 (abstract) (pdf)
The Founder and Head of the Dutch ADD Assoc. (Stichting ADD Nederland), Karin Windt, wrote: “Dr. Diamond changed millions of lives [by writing her article]…. For the first time we were heard and finally understood… The number of websites on ADD has increased from 4 to thousands…. Many people with attention deficits have great talents, often a high IQ, and are innovative and creative. However, they are seen as daydreamers who cannot concentrate well. In the old days we would be called stupid or lazy….Through her work we are now able to explain to others why ADD is so different from ADHD. This question remained unanswered until her article appeared in 2005.”

Prevor, M.B. & Diamond, A. (2005). Color-object interference in young children: A Stroop effect in children 3½-6½ years old. Cognitive Development, 20, 256-278. NIHMS16819 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Kirkham, N.Z. (2005). Not quite as grown-up as we like to think: Parallels between cognition in childhood and adulthood. Psychological Science, 16, 291-297. NIHMS16818 (abstract) (pdf)

Rennie, D., Bull, R. & Diamond, A. (2004). Executive functioning in preschoolers: Reducing the inhibitory demands of the dimensional change card sort task. Developmental Neuropsychology, 26, 423-443. PMID:15276903 (abstract) (pdf)

Munakata, Y., Casey, B.J., & Diamond, A. (2004). Developmental cognitive neuroscience: Progress and potential. Trends in Cognitive Science, 8, 122-128. PMID:15301752 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A., Briand , L., Fossella , J., & Gehlbach, L. (2004). Genetic and neurochemical modulation of prefrontal cognitive functions in children. American Journal of Psychiatry, 161, 125-132. PMID:14702260 (abstract) (pdf)
     - Highlighted by the journal in its “In this Issue” page.
     - Rated as “Exceptional” by the Faculty of 1000.
     - Ranked No. 2 in the Hidden Jewels Top 10 in Neuroscience  by the Faculty of 1000.

Wilkinson, K.M., Ross , E., & Diamond, A. (2003). Fast mapping of multiple words: Insights into when “the information provided” does and does not equal “the information perceived.” Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 24, 739-762. (abstract) (pdf)

Kirkham, N.Z. & Diamond, A. (2003). Sorting between theories of perseveration: Performance in conflict tasks requires memory, attention, and inhibition [Response]. Developmental Science , 6, 474-476. (pdf)

Kirkham , N.Z., Cruess , L. & Diamond, A. (2003). Helping children apply their knowledge to their behavior on a dimension-switching task. Developmental Science , 6, 449-467. (pdf)

Diamond, A., Lee, E-Y., & Hayden, M. (2003). Early success in using the relation between stimulus and reward to deduce an abstract rule: Perceived physical connectedness is key. Developmental Psychology, 39, 825-847. PMID:12952397 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A., Kirkham , N.Z., & Amso, D. (2002). Conditions under which young children CAN hold two rules in mind and inhibit a prepotent response. Developmental Psychology, 38, 352–362. PMID:12005379 (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2002). Normal development of prefrontal cortex from birth to young adulthood: Cognitive functions, anatomy, and biochemistry. In D.T. Stuss & R.T. Knight (eds.), Principles of frontal lobe function (p. 466-503). London, UK: Oxford University Press. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2002). A model system for studying the role of dopamine in prefrontal cortex during early development in humans. In M.H. Johnson, Y. Munakata, & R.O. Gilmore (eds.), Brain Development and Cognition: A Reader. (p 441-493). Blackwell Publishers. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2001). Looking closely at infants’ performance, and experimental procedures, in the A-not-B task. The Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24, 38-41. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2001). A model system for studying the role of dopamine in prefrontal cortex during early development in humans. In C. Nelson & M. Luciana (eds.), Handbook of developmental cognitive neuroscience, 433-472. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. (pdf)
     Reprinted in M.H. Johnson, Y. Munakata, & R.O. Gilmore (eds.). (2002).  Reader in brain development and cognition. London, UK: Blackwell Press.

Diamond, A. (2001). Prefrontal cortex development and development of cognitive functions. In Neil J. Smelser and Paul B. Baltes (Editors),  International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, 11976-11982. Oxford, UK: Pergamon. (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Lee, E.-Y. (2000). Inability of 5-month-old infants to retrieve a contiguous object: A failure of conceptual understanding or of control of action? Child Development, 71, 1477-1494. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2000). Toward an understanding of the human frontal lobes. [Review of the book The human frontal lobes: Functions and disorders. The science and practice of neuropsychology series, by Bruce L. Miller (Ed); Jeffrey L. Cummings (Ed) ]. Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books, 45, 564-565. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (2000). Close interrelation of motor development and cognitive development and of the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex. Child Development, 71, 44-56. PMID10836557 (Special issue: New directions for Child Development in the 21st Century). (abstract) (pdf)

Johnson, M.H., Aslin, R., Diamond, A., Hood, B., & Spelke, L. (2000). Human brain development: Perception, attention, and memory. Report for the Sackler Institute, commissioned by the McDonnell Foundation.

Diamond, A., Churchland, A., Cruess , L., & Kirkham , N. (1999). Early developments in the ability to understand the relation between stimulus and reward. Developmental Psychology, 35, 1507-1517. (abstract) (pdf)

Zagreda, L., Goodman, J., Druin, D.P., McDonald, D., & Diamond, A. (1999). Cognitive deficits in a genetic mouse model of the most common biochemical cause of human mental retardation. Journal of Neuroscience, 19, 6175-6182. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1999). Developmental psychology in its social and cultural context. Society for Research in Child Development Newsletter, 42, 5-8. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1999). Development of cognitive functions linked to prefrontal cortex. In N.A. Fox, L.A. Leavit, & J.G. Warhol (eds.), The Role of Early Experience in Infant Development, 131-144. Johnson & Johnson: New Brunswik, NJ. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1999). Review of "Comparative Neuropsychology. ed. A. David Milner, Oxford UP". Trends in Neurosciences. 22:283 - 284. (pdf)

Diamond, A., S. Badali, L. Cruess, D. Amso, M. Davidson and S. Oross. (1999). Long-lasting, selective visual deficits from short-term exposure to high neonatal phenylalanine levels in humans. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts. 25:501 - 501

O'Craven, K. M., A. Diamond, L. Cruess, R. Bergida, R. L. Savoy and M. Davidson (1999). Further fMRI-based studies of memory and inhibition in prefrontal cortex of adults. Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting Abstracts. (abstract)

Diamond, A. (1998). Understanding the A-not-B error: Working memory vs. reinforced response, or active vs. latent trace. Developmental Science, 1, 185-189. (abstract) (pdf)

Albert, M., Diamond, A., Fitch, H., Neville, H., Rapp, P., and Tallal, P. (1998). Cognitive Development. In F.E. Bloom, S.C. Landis, J.L. Roberts, L.R.Squire, & M.J. Zigmond (ed.s). Fundamental Neuroscience, 1313-1338. San Diego: Academic Press. (pdf)

Savoy, R. L. I., A. Diamond and K. M. O'Craven (1998). Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex contributions to working memory and inhibition as revealed by fMRI. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts. 24:1251.

Diamond, A., Prevor, M., Callender, G., & Druin, D.P. (1997). Prefrontal cortex cognitive deficits in children treated early and continuously for PKU. Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development (Monograph #252), 62 (4), 1-207. PMID:9421921 (abstract) (pdf)

see: Research in action: Lessening PKU's damaging effects on children

Diamond, A. (1996). Evidence for the importance of dopamine for prefrontal cortex functions early in life. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (London) Series B, 351, 1483-1494. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Herzberg, C. (1996). Impaired sensitivity to visual contrast in children treated early and continuously for PKU. Brain, 119, 523-538. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Taylor, C. (1996). Development of an aspect of executive control: Development of the abilities to remember what I said and to "Do as I say, not as I do." Developmental Psychobiology, 29, 315-334. (abstract) (pdf)

Strupp, B. & Diamond, A. (1996). Assessing cognitive function in animal models of mental retardation. Mental Retardation Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, 2, 216-226. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1995). Evidence of robust recognition memory early in life even when assessed by reaching behavior. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology (Special Issue [Guest Editor, Nora Newcombe]), 59, 419-456. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1994). Phenylalanine levels of 6-10 mg/dl may not be as benign as once thought. Acta Pædiatrica, 83 (Supplement 407), 89-91. (pdf)

Diamond, A., Ciaramitaro, V., Donner, E., Djali , S., & Robinson, M. (1994). An animal model of early-treated PKU. Journal of Neuroscience, 14, 3072-3082. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A., Cruttenden, L., & Neiderman, D. (1994). A-not-B with multiple wells: I. Why multiple wells are sometimes easier than two wells. II. Memory or memory + inhibition? Developmental Psychology, 30, 192-205. (pdf)

Diamond, A., Towle, C., & Boyer, K. (1994). Young children's performance on a task sensitive to the memory functions of the medial temporal lobe in adults, the delayed nonmatching to sample task, reveals problems that are due to non-memory related task demands. Behavioral Neuroscience, 108, 659-680. (abstract) (pdf)

Gerstadt, C., Hong, Y., & Diamond, A. (1994). The relationship between cognition and action: Performance of 3½-7 year old children on a Stroop-like day-night test. Cognition, 53, 129-153. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A., Werker, J., & Lalonde, C. (1993). Toward understanding commonalities in the development of object search, detour navigation, categorization, and speech perception. In G. Dawson & K. Fischer (Eds.), Human Behavior and the Developing Brain (p. 380-426). Guilford Press: NY. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1992). Recognition memory assessed by looking versus reaching: Infants' performance on the visual paired comparison and delayed non-matching to sample tasks. Technical Report IRCS-92-11, University of Pennsylvania, Institute for Research in Cognitive Science.

Diamond, A., Ciaramitaro, V., Donner, E., Hurwitz, W., Lee, E., Grover, W., Minarcik, C. (1992). Prefrontal cortex cognitive deficits in early-treated PKU: Results of a longititudinal study in children and of an animal model. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts. 18. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1991). Frontal lobe involvement in cognitive changes during the first year of life. In K. R. Gibson & A. C. Petersen (Eds.), Brain maturation and cognitive development: Comparative and cross-cultural perspectives (pp. 127-180). NY: Aldine de Gruyter. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1991). Neuropsychological insights into the meaning of object concept development. In S. Carey & R. Gelman (Eds.), The epigenesis of mind: Essays on biology and knowledge (pp. 67-110). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. (pdf)
        Reprinted in M. H. Johnson (Ed.) (1993), Brain Development and Cognition: A Reader, Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell.

Diamond, A. (1991). Guidelines for the study of brain-behavior relationships during development. In H. Levin, H. Eisenberg, & A. Benton (Eds.), Frontal lobe function and dysfunction (pp. 339-378). NY: Oxford U. Press. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (Ed.) (1990), The development and neural bases of higher cognitive functions. NY: New York Academy of Sciences.(pdf)

Diamond, A. (1990). The development and neural bases of memory functions, as indexed by the A-not-B and delayed response tasks, in human infants and infant monkeys. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 608, 267-317. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1990). Rate of maturation of the hippocampus and the developmental progression of children's performance on the delayed non-matching to sample and visual paired comparison tasks. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 608, 394-426. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1990). Developmental time course in human infants and infant monkeys, and the neural bases, of inhibitory control in reaching. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 608, 637-676. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1990). Introduction. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 608(1), xiii-lvi. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1989). Limbic-dependent memory: Early or late developing? Society for Neuroscience Abstracts. 15 : 343 - 343.

Diamond, A. & Doar, B. (1989). The performance of human infants on a measure of frontal cortex function, the delayed response task. Developmental Psychobiology, 22, 271-294. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Gilbert, J. (1989). Development as progressive inhibitory control of action: Retrieval of a contiguous object. Cognitive Development, 4, 223-249. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. & Goldman-Rakic, P. S. (1989). Comparison of human infants and rhesus monkeys on Piaget's A-not-B task: Evidence for dependence on dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Experimental Brain Research, 74, 24-40. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A., Zola-Morgan, S., & Squire, L. R. (1989). Successful performance by monkeys with lesions of the hippocampal formation on A-not-B and object retrieval, two tasks that mark developmental changes in human infants. Behavioral Neuroscience, 103, 526-537. (abstract) (pdf)

Diamond, A. and K. Boyer (1989). A version of the Wisconsin Card Sort Test for use with preschool children, and an exploration of their sources of error. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 11 : 83 - 83.

Diamond, A. (1988). Differences between adult and infant cognition: Is the crucial variable presence or absence of language? In L. Weiskrantz (Ed.), Thought without language (p. 337-370). Oxford U. Press: Oxford. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1988). Abilities and neural mechanisms underlying A-not-B performance. Child Development, 59, 523-527. (pdf)

Goldman-Rakic, P. S. and A. Diamond (1986). Comparative development in human infants and infant rhesus monkeys of cognitive functions that depend on prefrontal cortex. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts. 12 : 742 - 742.

Diamond, A. (1985). The development of the ability to use recall to guide action, as indicated by infants' performance on A-not-B. Child Development, 56, 868-883. (abstract) (pdf)

Goldman-Rakic, P. S. and A. Diamond (1985). Evidence for involvement of prefrontal cortex in cognitive changes during the first year of life: Comparison of performance of human infant and rhesus monkeys on a detour task with transparent barrier. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts. 11 : 832 - 832.

Diamond, A. (1983). Behavior changes between 6 to 12 months of age: What can they tell us about how the mind of the infant is changing? Dissertation Abstracts International. 44(01B) : 337. (pdf)

Diamond, A. (1981). Retrieval of an object from an open box: The development of visual-tactile control of reaching in the first year of life. Society for Research in Child Development Abstracts. 3 : 78 - 78.

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Education and Training

Yale University
School of Medicine
Postdoctoral Fellow
1982-1985
Neuroanatomy
(Laboratory of Patricia Goldman-Rakic)
Harvard University
Ph.D., 1983
Psychology and Social Relations Dept.,
Developmental Psychology (advisor, Jerome Kagan)
Swarthmore College
B.A., 1975
1) Psychology
2) Sociology & Anthropology
London School of Economics
1972
Philosophy of Science (advisor, Imre Lakatos)

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Personal

     Dancing

I love to be active and outdoors in nature with others. Love to hike, play tennis, and canoe.

Most of all I love to dance -- any kind of dancing as long as you get to interact with your partner -- swing dance, waltz, contradancing, tango, hambo, vintage, zwiefacher, and more.

Was a member of a contradance troupe that toured the Soviet Union in the Spring following the fall of the Berlin wall. Here is a picture of me dancing on the Arabat, a main street in Moscow.

Our band set up a little platform and people gathered around to see what we might be doing. Little did they know that each of us would invite one of them to dance with us as our partners. What a wonderful way to meet people! We went on to Odessa, Leningrad (not yet re-named St. Petersburg), and Riga. The Soviets allowed us only 36 hours in Riga, but we made the most of them.

 

 

Had such a good time, I organized and led another group of 40 dancers

and a band of terrific musicians (BLT: Peter Barnes, Mary Lea, and Bill Tomczak) to tour Czechoslovakia (České Budějovice in southern Bohemia, Zlin in the Moravian-Silesian Beskids, & Prague) two years later (June, 1992). Here they are clowning with caller, Larry Edelman, on mandolin.

 

some photos of those we met along the way:

 


Instead of staying in hotels, we stayed with local families and made close friends in southern Bohemia (České Budĕjovice), Moravia (Zlin), and Prague.

Here, Adele and Mary Lea are pictured with the family they stayed with in Zlin.

Of course, both the USSR and Czechoslovakia ceased to exist very soon after I visited, but I think it is safe to have me visit as a scholar or scientist. It is only as a dancer that my visits appear to coincide with regime change.

I got to bring together my academic and dance interests when I hosted a meeting on the “The Development and Neural Basis of Higher Cognitive Functions” and arranged for another incredibly wonderful band (Wild Asparagus: Becky Tracy, Stuart Kenney, George Marshall, Ann Percival, & David Cantien) to play for an evening of dance at the meeting.

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Brain Development and Learning Conference

For more information about the Brain Development and Learning Conference, visit the websites:

2013 Brain Development and Learning Meeting:  braindevelopmentandlearning.com/BDL2013/
                               Online Resources

2010 Brain Development and Learning Meeting:  www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/bdl.html
                                In Utero Effects; Parent-Infant Interaction
                                Learning & Memory; Math and Reading
                                Respecting Cultural Differences
                                Mental Health; Promoting Joy, Resilience, and Creativity

2010 Conference Feedback: www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/BDL_subpages_2010/feedback_big_2010.html

2010 Online Resources: www.braindevelopmentandlearning.com/Resources2010

2008 Brain Development and Learning Meeting:   www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/bdl2008.html
                               Stress
                               Prefrontal Cortex

2008 Conference Feedback: www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/BDL_subpages_2008/sponsorsfeedback.html

2006 Brain Development and Learning Meeting:   www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/bdl2006.html
                               Plasticity
                               Interventions

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Grant Support - 2005 to present
(continuous NIH /NSF support since 1975; continuous NIH support since 1983)

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) R01 #DA037285: "Differences by Sex and Genotype in the Effects of Stress on Executive Functions”
PI: Adele Diamond (20% effort)
Project period: 01/15/2014 - 03/31/2019 Total costs: $1,053,530 US

     To study the influences of gender (mediated by hormone levels) and genetic variation on executive functions, cognition and behavioral control when under mild stress and to replicate with humans the animal study findings of a sex difference in the effect of mild stress on cognition.

BC Ministry of Health and BC Mental Health Foundation: “Seed Funds to Introduce a Pilot Program of Tools of the Mind to the Lower Mainland”
PI: Adele Diamond (15% effort)
Project period: 8/01/2011 - 09/01/2015 Total costs: $200,000 CAN

     For the first introduction of the evidence-based early-childhood program, Tools of the Mind, anywhere in Canada. Funds implementing a pilot introduction of Tools into randomly selected kindergartens in Vancouver, Surrey, & Coquitlam. Tools curriculum improves EFs & academics, at least short-term - at least in the US. We will address the next important questions: Are those benefits also seen in Canada? Are they ephemeral? Or, might they not only last but increase over time?

Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Operating Grant #325848: "Attention Bias and Executive Functions in 9-14 year olds following Prenatal Antidepressant Exposure"
PI: Tim Oberlander
Co-PIs: Adele Diamond, Rollin Brant, Angela Devlin, Ruth Grunau, Joanne Weinberg
Project period: 03/03/2014 - 03/03/2019 Total costs: $1,170,840 CAN

Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Grant: "Mindfulness and Work Performance”
PI: Dan Skarlicki
Collaborators: Adele Diamond, Kim Schonert-Reichl
Project period: 04/1/2014 - 03/31/2019 Total costs: $148,000 CAN

Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) EG #1502: “Neurochemical and Environmental Influences on the Cognitive Functions dependent on Prefrontal Cortex”
PI: Adele Diamond
Project period: 04/31/2012 - 03/31/2013 Total costs: $25,000 CAN

     To better understand the causes and consequences of stress reactivity in PFC, including gender differences in that and practical implications of that for education, parenting, labor force involvement, and personal well-being.

National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) R01 #DA019685: “Development of Cognitive Functions Linked to Frontal Lobe”
PI: Adele Diamond (25% effort)
Project period: 9/10/2004 - 3/09/2011 Total direct costs: $1,352,614 US

     The focus throughout all periods of this award has been to explore the cognitive requirements of tasks thought to depend on prefrontal cortex. This award forms the bedrock for Dr. Diamond’s larger endeavor to systematically investigate and dissect executive control functions, studying their development, neural bases, genetic and neurochemical modulation, and involvement in brain disorders -- from infancy through old age.
     The comprehensive and careful task manipulations here should yield important new information about the conditions under which children and adults of different ages succeed and fail at different types of executive functions. A notable strength is the parsing of inhibitory control into subtypes (such as inhibition at the level of attention and inhibition at the level of action; inhibition in the context of task-switching and inhibition in steady-state.)

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) R01 #MH071893: "Autism and the Development of Relational Awareness"
PI: Adele Diamond (15% effort)
co-PI: Rebecca Landa at Kennedy Krieger Institute (KKI)
Project period: 1/01/2007 - 12/31/2013 Total costs: $2,104,016 US

     This project investigates the hypothesis that some young children with autism may need to see a physical connection to help them grasp an abstract conceptual connection. Preschool children with autism, even if mildly developmentally delayed, may well be able to learn abstract rules, but the way materials have been presented to them has not enabled them to demonstrate and use that ability. They can grasp relations between things (i.e., the conceptual connection between items), I hypothesize, if those things are physical connected.

Canada Research Chair (CRC) Tier 1: “Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience”
PI: Adele Diamond
Project period: 9/01/2004 - 08/31/2011 Total costs: $1,400,000 CAN
Renewed: 09/01/2011 - 08/31/2018Total costs: $1,400,000 CAN

     Exploring how genetics, neurochemistry and the environment affect prefrontal cortex, and what early-childhood practices and interventions lead to the best mental and physical health results. This research should lessen the costly public health burden of executive-function disorders, and improve the chances for all children to achieve their full potential.

Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) Award: “Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory”
PI: Adele Diamond (no % effort)
Project period: 9/01/2004 - 3/31/2013 Total costs with matching funds: $500,220 CAN

     For equipping PI’s laboratory at UBC.

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) R01 #HD039783:  Pain in Preterm Infants: Development and Effects"
PI: Ruth Grunau            Collaborator: Adele Diamond (2% effort) with many other collaborators
Project Period:  04/05/2008 - 11/30/2012 Total costs:  $1,062,496 US 

     This research addresses the effects of cumulative neonatal pain/stress on stress regulation and neuro-development attention, visual memory, EFs, & behavior in children born very prematurely.

UBC Hampton Research Endowment Fund #FAS F10-01301: “Using Social & Emotional Learning Interventions to Promote Resiliency & Positive Mental Health in Children & Teachers: Considering Psychological, Biological, & Contextual Processes”
PI: Kimberly Schonert-Reichl
Co-PI: Adele Diamond (5% effort) and Rob Roeser
Project period: 03/2011- 03/2013 Total direct costs: $25,000 CAN

     This research is looking at the possible benefits for students and for teachers of two different social-emotional school programs (MindUp & SMART) with children in grades 4-7 randomly assigned to one of four conditions.

Institute of Education Sciences [IES] / National Center for Education Research [NCER] / Cognition and Student Learning Research Grant Program [CASL] #R305B070240:
“Evaluating the Efficacy of Preschool Curricula in Improving Executive Functions and Self-Regulation”
PI: Adele Diamond (10% effort)
Project period: 7/01/2007 - 05/19/2008 Total direct costs: $2,887,292 US
AD terminated the grant early (it had been originally awarded for 4 years) and returned 80% of the funds to IES because she felt that the PI of the RCT on which this award was piggy-backing was acting in a scientifically unethical manner. (It would have been easier to keep the funding and keep her mouth shut, but she felt this was a matter of conscience.)

     with co-funding from:

Spencer Foundation: “Can Self-Regulation be Taught to Preschoolers? If so, does it help?”
PI: Adele Diamond (10% effort)
Project period: 11/01/2006-6/31/2011 Total direct costs: $410,396 US

     Building on the ground-breaking work on the early development of executive functions and self-regulation from developmental cognitive neuroscience labs, we are using those research tools to investigate pre- and post-intervention levels of self-regulation and executive function and tracking the relation of those to academic achievement and behavior problems over time in at-risk children enrolled in evidence-based preschool programs with varying degrees and types of training in self-regulation and executive functions.
     What produces the best outcomes: Preschool teaching practices that emphasize academic skills or that emphasize that plus executive function (EF)? Can EF training be effective as a module added onto the curriculum or does it need to be interwoven throughout daily activities? Which interventions are most beneficial for which aspects of EFs and academic performance? Are there longterm benefits to training preschoolers in how to exercise EFs for academic performance and/or for averting behavioral, psychological, and/or learning problems? Objective, proven, neurocognitive pre- and post-intervention EF measures will be used to examine the effect of different preschool programs on academic outcomes in literacy and math. It includes roughly 2,000 children in 2 States (NM & MA) and involves randomized field trial with 4 levels of EF training, emphasizes painstakingly careful data collection and analysis, and includes state-of-the-art academic measures and procedures for tracing special education placement. The innovations being studied are evidence-based, easy to implement in under-funded classrooms, and readily transferable across cultures.

National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 #HD044796: "Neurocognitive Development in Children Living in Poverty"
PI: Linda Mayes, M.D., Yale Univ. Med. Sch.
co-PI: Adele Diamond (5% effort)
Project period: 3/01/2005 - 6/28/2010 Total direct costs: $2,350,000 US

     While many studies have shown an association between economic deprivation and impaired cognitive development in childhood, no studies have explored the impact of economic and environmental disadvantage on component neurocognitive capacities within executive control functions. We propose that one mechanism for the impact of poverty on cognitive development may be through delayed or impaired executive control functions (e.g., working memory & selective attention, more specifically through an impairment in inhibitory executive control functions), and we will investigate this bringing together five disciplines—behavioral neuroscience, epidemiology, child development, neuropsychology, and economics.

UBC Dept. of Psychiatry: “Children at Elevated Risk for Developing Depression during Adolescence (Children of Mothers with Bipolar 1 Disorder): Might Impaired Executive Functions Precede and Predict the Onset of Depression?”
PIs: Adele Diamond (5% effort) + Jane Garland & Allan Young
Project period: 06/01/2006 - 12/31/2009 Total direct costs: $ 172,000 CAN

     Children of mothers with confirmed diagnoses of bipolar I depression will receive extensive evaluations yearly from 7 through 17 years of age, if continued funding can be obtained.

Recent Grant support - click here.

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Teaching

In Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia:

In other departments, University of British Columbia:

  • Directed Studies Course, teaching undergrad student Sophia Lee as a Directed Studies student in the Integrated Science program (2014)
  • Graduate seminar in Dept. of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education (EPSE 604: Social, Emotional, and Cognitive Development in Social, Cultural, and Biological Context)
  • Annual lecture in Neuroscience Graduate Seminar (Neuroscience 501: Systems Neuroscience)
  • Biennial lecture in Faculty of Education Graduate Courses on Theories of Cognitive Abilities or Assessment of Young Children
  • Guest lecture in Cognitive Systems undergraduate course (Cogs 401)
  • Invited lecture on developmental cognitive neuroscience, at the request of the students, for 4th year Biomedical students at UBC

In the Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT):

  • Graduate Seminar: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Undergraduate course: Developmental Psychology

Comments from undergraduate students at MIT the one year this course was taught there

In Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania:

  • Developmental Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology: The Social and Emotional Growth of the Person
  • Undergraduate Seminar: Developmental Psychology throughout the Life Cycle
  • Graduate Proseminar: Cognitive Development
  • Graduate Proseminar: Socio-Emotional Development
  • Graduate Proseminar: Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Graduate Seminar: Development and Neural Bases of Higher Cognitive Functions
  • Graduate Seminar: Systems Neuroscience (co-taught with other Neuroscience faculty)

Comments from students at the University of Pennsylvania during the 7 years (1988 – 2004) this course was taught there

In Department of Psychology, Washington University:

  • Developmental Psychology: The Social and Emotional Growth of the Person
  • Developmental Psychology throughout the Life Cycle
  • Research Methods in Experimental Psychology
  • Seminar: Cognitive Development and its Relation to Maturation of the Brain (co-taught with Michael Posner in 1987)

In Department of Psychology and Social Relations, Harvard University:

  • Cog. Dev. in the Second Half of the First Year of Life: The Object Retrieval Experiment
  • Directed Reading and Research: Socioemotional Development during Infancy
  • Head Teaching Fellow, Psychology of the Human Life Cycle (Prof. George Goethals)
  • Teaching Fellow, Research Methods in Social Psychology
    Certified to teach secondary school social studies

Certified to teach secondary school social studies

  • Student teacher, Nether Providence High School, Wallingford, PA 1974-75

Graduate Students Supervised and/or Co-Supervised

at UBC:

  • Graduate Advisor (2012 – present), Kim Viljoen, Interdisciplinary Studies PhD program
  • Graduate Advisor (to start 2012), Angela Low, transferring from a MEd program to an MA program
  • Graduate Advisor (2012 - present), Golnoush Alamian, Neuroscience MSc program
  • Graduate Advisor (2012 - present), Jacqueline Davis, Interdisciplinary PhD program
  • Graduate Advisor (2011 - present), Hadas Av-Gay, PhD Candidate in Special Education
  • Co-Supervisor (2011 - present), Mona Have Sørensen, PhD Candidate, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense
  • Graduate Advisor (2011), Nicole Sanford, PhD Candidate in Neuroscience
  • Graduate Advisor (2011), Kathleen Lee, PhD Candidate in Neuroscience
  • Graduate Advisor (2006 - 2010), Jeanette Evans, PhD Candidate in Neuroscience
  • Adjunct Graduate Advisor (2005 - present), Michelle Kozey, PhD Candidate in Educational & Counseling Psychology
  • Graduate Advisor (2008 – 2010), Lisa Barker, MA Candidate in Neuroscience
  • University examiner (2012), PhD thesis defence, Megan Gray
  • Member (2011 - present), Co-thesis advisor, Mona Have Sørensen
  • Member (2008 - present), Master’s Committee, Tamara Crozier
  • Member (2006 - present), PhD Committee, Jonathan Epp
  • Member (2006 - present), Master’s Committee, Kamyar Keramatian
  • Member (2010 - 2014), PhD Committee, Jay Hosking
  • Member (2005 - 2008), Master’s Committee, Orsolya Magyar
  • Member (2004 - 2005), Dissertation Committee, Heike Dumke, PhD Candidate in Neuroscience
  • Member (2007 - 2009), Membership Committee, Green College, UBC
  • Promoted the work of neuroscience PhD student, Andy Shih (advisor: Tim Murphy) and tried to spearhead multi-site clinical trials based on the implications of Andy’s work for minimizing the consequences of perinatal hypoxia/ischemia for the infant’s brain:
    • Organized & cooked a lunch at BC Children’s Hospital for a discussion between Andy, Mary Connolly (Head, Child Neurology), Philippe Chessex ( Head, Div. of Neonatology), & David Holtzman (Head, Neurology, Washington University Medical School)
    • Arranged for Andy to present at the Combined Perinatal Rounds at BC Children’s & Women’s

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Past Trainees

Many who've worked with me have gone on to careers in science & education. Examples:

Amber Story, PhD - Deputy Division Director, Div. of Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE), National Science Foundation (NSF).
Michiel Westenberg, PhD - Prof. & Chair, Developmental Psychology, Leiden Univ.; Director, Research Institute on Motivated Cognition and Behavior, Leiden Univ.; Scientific Director, National Institute for the Study of Education and Human Development, Netherlands.
James Bailey, PhD - Prof., Organizational Behavior & Development, George Washington Univ.
Katharine Verdolini Abbott, PhD – Prof., Communication and Science Disorders, Univ. of Pittsburgh
Ruth Litovsky, PhD - Prof., Dept. of Communicative Disorders & Dept. of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison. (Ruth made a major discovery in the assessment children’s auditory attention, which was patented.)
Susan Rivera, PhD - Prof., Center for Mind and Brain, Univ. of California-Davis.
Elizabeth Donner, MD - Neurologist & Project Director, Neurosciences & Mental Health, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto.
Natasha Kirkham, PhD - Lecturer in Psychology & RCUK Fellow in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, Dept. of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck College, Univ. of London.
Glenda Callender, MD - Ass't Prof. of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Univ. of Louisville School of Medicine, KY.
Dima Amso, PhD - Ass't Prof., Brown Univ.
Melissa Goldberg, PhD - Ass't Prof., Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine.
Matt Davidson, PhD - Ass't Prof., Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst.
Kristin Shutts, PhD - Ass't Prof., Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison.
Vivian Ciaramitaro, PhD - Ass't Prof., Dept. of Psychology. Univ. of Massachusetts – Boston.
Wolfgang Rauch, PhD - Instructor, Dept. of Psychology, Goethe-Universitat, Frankfurt, Germany.
Mery Prevor, MD - Ophthalmologist in private practice.
Kim Dilda Shaw, MD - Family Practice Physician, Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, NC.
Ben Geertz, MD - Pediatric Neurology Resident, Georgetown Univ. Hospital.
Emily Jacobs, PhD – Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Research Associate Psychologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in the Department of Medicine where she is in the Division of Women’s Health, Connors Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology.
Lisa Briand, PhD – Postdoctoral Fellow, Pierce Laboratory of Addiction Neuroscience, University. of Pennsylvania.
Lisa Barker, MA - part-time faculty, psychology dept., Trinity Western Univ., Langley, BC
Theresa (Leze) Zagreda - MD student at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
Loren Cruess Anderson - EdD student at Tufts Univ.
Sarah Munro – 3rd year PhD student in Neuroscience at Univ. of California-Berkeley (has an NSF Graduate Fellowship).
Karine Gazarian - 3rd year PhD student, Institute of Neurology, Univ. College, London (has a fellowship).

Undergraduate Independent Studies & Honor Theses Advised - click here.

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Awards

2015 Awarded an honorary degree from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,Beer-Sheva, Israel
2014 On a list of the 30 most influential neuroscientists alive today, listed as #13 (only woman in the top 23)
  Received the Urie Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contributions to Developmental Psychology in the Service of Science and Society from the American Psychological Association. The Bronfenbrenner Award is given to an individual whose work has, over a lifetime career, contributed not only to the science of developmental psychology, but who has also worked to apply developmental psychology to society.
  Elected a Fellow of APA, Division 1 (General) beginning Jan. 2015.
2013 Gertrude Weigum Hinsz Lecture, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND
  Visiting Professor. Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel.
  Featured Speaker, Cities Fit for Children Provinical Summit Pre-Conference: A special evening for parents and caregivers, Surrey, BC.
  Keynote Address. 103rd Arizona Town Hall, Grand Canyon, AZ.
  Invited Plenary Address, Annual meeting of the European Society of Pediatric Research, Porto, Portugal.
  Keynote Address. Northwest Cognitive and Memory Conference, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, BC.
  Keynote Address. Educare Learning Network’s annual meeting, Phoenix, AZ
2012 Keynote Address, European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Utrecht, Netherlands
  Keynote Address, ‘Key Issues in Childhood Physical Activity Science,' 7th European Youth Heart Study Scientific Symposium: , Madeira, Portugal
  Keynote Address, First Things First Presummit Symposium on School Readiness, Phoenix, AZ
  Keynote Address, TrygFonden Multi-disciplinary symposium, "Improving the well-being of children and youth,” Copenhagen, Denmark
  Keynote Address, Early Childhood Education Research Forum, Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE), Towson, MD
  Plenary Address, Special Symposium at Leiden University in Honor of Prof. Leo de Sonneville, Leiden, Netherlands
  Pease Family Scholar Lecture, Iowa State University, Ames, IA
  “Activities and Programs That Improve Children’s Executive Functions” appeared in Psychology Progress (Dec. 9) (which alerts the scientific community to breaking journal articles considered to represent the best in psychology research)
  Profiled in a textbook titled Child Psychology, 3rd edition, by Alastair J. Younger, Ross Vasta, Scott A. Adler, Scott A. Miller, & Shari Ellis - in the 'Canadian Contributions' section – publisher: John Wiley & Sons
  Public Address, sponsored by the Dalai Lama Centre, Vancity Theatre, Vancouver, BC
  Worldwide Who's Who: 2012- present
2011 Inaugural Speaker in Visiting Distinguished Scholar Program, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute & School of Medicine, Roanoke, VA
  Renewal of Tier 1 Canada Research Chair
  Frijda Public Lecture, Cognitive Science Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  Logan Lecture, Centennial Academy, Montreal, QC
  Pickering Lecture in Development Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON
  Keynote Address, Roeper School, Bloomfield Hills, MI
  Keynote Address, Cross-Cultural Symposium on Early Childhood Education: Educating the Heart, Body and Mind, Richmond, BC
  Keynote Address, 37th Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology, Minneapolis, MN
  Keynote Address, New York Academy of Sciences, 2nd Annual Aspen Brain Forum, Conference on the Cognitive Neuroscience of Learning and Education, Aspen, CO
  Keynote Address, 22nd Annual Boston Trauma Conference, Boston, MA
  Keynote Address, Ethical Culture Fieldston School, New York City, NY
  Plenary Address, NICHD Vision Workshop on Behavior, Bethesda, MD
2010 Valedictory Address, Conference on Science, Spirituality, and Education, presided over by the Dalai Lama, sponsored by Namgyal Institute of Tibetology, to advise the Government of Sikkim in their endeavor to overhaul the Provisional Education System so that they educate not only the head but also the heart, in Gangtok, Sikkim, India
  Jane Holmes Bernstein Lecture in Developmental Neuropsychology, Psychiatry Grand Rounds, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA
 

Keynote Addresses at:

International Workshop on “Selection and Control Mechanisms in Perception and Action,” Jerusalem, Israel

Annual General Meeting, Association Montessori Internationale, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Continuing Education credits provided

Royce Conference, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

  Plenary Address, Making Connections Conference, organized by UBC School Psychology Program, Richmond, BC
  featured at the annual UBC Gala, “Celebrate Research Week,” a short video vignette was devoted to Prof. Diamond and her research
  Robbie Case Memorial Lecture, University of Toronto’s Institute of Child Study, Ontario
2009 Elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada
  Elected a Fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists (SEP), the oldest honorary society for psychology
  One of three scientists invited to speak on stage with the Dalai Lama and another Nobel Peace Laureate, Mairead Maguire, on “Heart-Mind Education: Enhancing academic, social, and emotional competence” at the Orpheum Theatre, Vancouver, broadcast live worldwide by CTV as part of the Vancouver Peace Summit
See video at: watch.ctv.ca/2009-peace-summit/vancouver/2009-vancouver-peace-summit-tuesday-september-29th-2009/#clip217357
and: www.youtube.com/watch?v=kD2cWBGMVAg
  Recipient, YWCA Woman of Distinction Award (recognized nationally as a important award for women)
  Recipient, Inaugural Distinguished Achievement Award for Service to the University and Community, awarded by the Faculty of Medicine, UBC
  one of a handful of scientists invited to meet with the Dalai Lama for a week at his official residence in Dharamsala, India
  Featured Researcher at the Board of Governor’s Meeting, University of British Columbia, Vancouver
  Helen H. Molinari Memorial Lecture in Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY
  John P. Zubek Memorial Lecture, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg
 

Keynote Addresses at:

Conference on “School Readiness and School Success: From research to policy and practice,” Quebec City, QC

Annual Conference, Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI), Sydney, AU

Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI) 2009 Conference, Sydney, AU

British Psychological Society Annual Meeting, Developmental Section, Nottingham, UK

First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition, Honoring Our Advocacy Fundraiser, Vancouver

  Invited Address, APA Annual Convention Division 7 (Developmental), Toronto, ON
  Invited Address, APA Annual Convention Division 40 (Neuropsychology), Toronto, ON
  Invited Workshop at the Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI) Annual Conference, Sydney, AU
2008 named a William James Distinguished Lecturer, by the Association for Psychological Science.
  RO Jones Memorial Speaker, Canadian Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting, Vancouver, BC
  Birch Lecture for the International Neuropsychological Society (INS) meeting, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  Commencement Speaker for the Eaton Arrowsmith School, Vancouver, BC
  Keynote Address at the biennial meeting of the International Conference on Infant Studies (ICIS), Vancouver, BC
  Who's Who Among Executives and Professionals, and in the 2008-2009 "Honors Edition"
2007 Opening of the Academic Year Address, Maastricht University, NL
  Keynote Address, HELP Workshop on Innovative Assessment Practices: Supporting Families & Community, Vancouver, BC
2006 Elected a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science (APS)
  Alberta Health FMR Visiting Scholar, Alberta Children's Hospital, University of Alberta, & Hotckiss Brain Institute, Calgary, Alberta
  Woman of Distinction Finalist, YWCA, Vancouver, BC
2005 Elected to the Board of Governors of the International Neuropsychological Society (INS)
  Brain Awareness Week Lecturer, McMaster University's Dept. of Psychiatry & Behavioural Neurosciences, Dept. of Psychology, and Brain-Body Institute, Hamilton, ON
  Henry Dunn Lecture, the Northwest Pacific Pediatric Neurology Society Annual Meeting
  Hira Panikkar Memorial Lecture, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, BC Children’s Hospital
2004 Awarded a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair
  Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) Award
 

Invited Addresses:

Biennial Conference on Human Development, Washington, DC

Meeting on “Emerging Self-Regulation: The Measurement of Executive Function during Early Childhood,” Penn. State University

Annual Research Day, Psychiatry Dept., UBC Medical School, Vancouver, BC

  Invited Workshop at joint Internat’l Neuropsych. Society/ASSBI conference, Brisbane, AU
2003 Elected to the Executive Board of the Cognitive Development Society
  Visiting Professor, University of California, San Francisco
  Recommended by the APA to serve on the Working Group of NIMH Advisory Council to develop guidelines to prioritize basic research (incl. behavioral, cognitive, & molecular)
  Keynote Address, Conf. on ADHD and Apraxia, Annual Meeting on Movement Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY
  Invited Instructor, Merck Fdn. summer course on the “Biology of Developmental Disabilities”
  Invited presentation, NIH Inter-agency Conf. on Prefrontal Cortex & Executive Function, New York, NY
2002 Distinguished Speaker, Cornell University, Department of Psychology, Ithaca, NY
  Opening Keynote Address, Conference on "Développement cognitif et troubles des appren-tissages: Evaluer, comprendre, réduquer et prendre en charge," Strasbourg, France
  Invited Address on "Self-Control in Young Children," Cuyahoga Community College, Cleveland, OH
  Invited Workshop on "The Neuropsychology of Treated PKU," International Neuropsychological Society (INS) Annual Meeting, Toronto, ON
 

Other invited talks:

in Invited Symposium on "The Prefrontal Cortex and Cognition: New Insights into Willful Behavior," American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting, Boston, MA

at International Mtg on "PKU: Brain-Behavior Sequelae," Amsterdam, Netherlands

at International Meeting of Developmental Neurology, on "The Clumsy Child - Aetiology, Pathophysiology and Treatment," Groningen, Netherlands

2001 to present. Member, College of Reviewers for the Canada Research Chairs program, NSERC
  to present. Member, ‘Faculty of 1000’: In the Faculty of 1000, the field of biology is divided into 17 Faculties with the aim of organizing & evaluating the life sciences literature. I am in the Cog. Neurosci. section headed by Richard Morris & Leslie Ungerleider, within the Neurosci. Faculty headed by Martin Raff, Chuck Stevens, Bill Newsome, & Carla Shatz
2001 to present. Member, Senior Advisory Board of National Center for Children in the Public Interest
2001

Invited Speaker at:

Invited Symposium on "Use of Imaging Techniques in Developmental Research," International Society for Dev.al Psychobiology Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA

“The Developing Child: Brain and Behavior” Symposium Series co-sponsored by the Erikson Institute and the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

"Nelson Butters' West Coast Neuropsychology Conference," San Diego, CA

Intercampus Neuroscience Symposium, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, MA

“Foundations of Human Knowledge Acquisition: New Evidence from Infant Researchand Neuroscience,” Hanse Institute, Delmenhorst, Germany

Invited NIDA Symposium on “Neurotransmitters in Brain & Behavioral Development,” Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Minneapolis, MN

Invited Symposium on the “Development and Organization of Prefrontal Function,” Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Minneapolis, MN

Invited Instructor, Cold Spring Harbor summer course on “Developmental Cognitive Neurosci.”

2000

21st Century Award for Achievement, International Biographical Centre, Cambridge, UK, named one of the “2000 Outstanding Women of the 20th Century,” one of the first so honored.

 

Keynote Addresses at:

Annual Retreat, Zlotowski Center for Neurosci., Ben Gurion Univ., Beer Sheva, Israel

“Pediatric Neuroimaging and Drugs," NIDA Meeting, Bethesda, MD

Biennial Congress of the German Psychological Association, Jena, Germany

ZERO TO THREE Leadership Development Initiative, New Orleans, LA

 

Named one of the “2000 Outstanding Women of the 20th Century,” IBC, Cambridge, UK

 

Invited Speaker at:

“The Frontal Lobes 2000,” Rotman Research Inst. Conf., Toronto, ON

“The Relation of PFC Dev. to Children’s Cognitive and Social Behavior,” Phila., PA

Invited Instructor, McDonnell Summer Institute in Cognitive Neuroscience, Hanover, NH

1999

-present: Listed in “Who’s Who in America” and “Who’s Who in the World”

1997

Named a Distinguished Scientific Lecturer by the American Psychological Association

 

Elected a Fellow of APA, Division 6 (Behavioral Neuroscience & Comparative Psychology) "in recognition of outstanding & unusual contributions to the science and profession of psychology"

1995

Presented the Master Lecture on Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at the Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Indianapolis, IN
"A Master Lecture is intended as a sort of tutorial in a particular field....The individuals invited to deliver these major addresses are people who are widely recognized as leaders in their fields...."

 

Invited Instructor, American Academy of Neurology course on Behavioral Neurology, Seattle, WA

1993

Elected a Fellow of APA, Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) "in recognition of outstanding & unusual contributions to the science and profession of psychology"

 

Tjossem Memorial Lecture, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

1975

NSF Graduate Fellowship

 

Danforth Graduate Fellowship

 

Phi Beta Kappa

 

Sigma Xi

 

Graduated with highest honor in Swarthmore College's course program of study

1973

NIMH Undergraduate Research Fellowship

1972

Hunter Grubb Scholarship

1970

-1975 Swarthmore National Scholarship

1970

Valedictorian, John Browne High School, New York, NY

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Invited Talks and Conference Presentations

Keynotes and Addresses, Invited Workshops and Talks

Each year Dr. Diamond gives invited addresses in North America & abroad (including Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, France, the Netherlands, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK (England, Scotland, & Wales), USSR, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru, India, Indonesia, Israel, Australia, & New Zealand) to audiences ranging from neurologists, psychiatrists, pediatricians, & neuropsychologists, to educators, developmental psychologists, & early childcare providers, to lawyers & policy makers, to psychoanalysts, clinical psychologists, & rehabilitation therapists.

In 2012 alone, she gave 40 invited addresses. In 2013, she gave 39. In 2014, she is scheduled to give, or has already given invited talks all over North America, plus three other continents: Europe (the Netherlands & Switzerland), Asia (Bali in Indonesia & Israel), and South America (Chile, Ecuador & Peru).

Upcoming Talks

Diamond, A. (to be presented sometime between Jan. - March, 2015). Title: tba. Invited talk, All day education event, Vancouver Coastal Health, West Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (to be presented Jan. 30, 2015). Title: tba. Invited Keynote Address, Increasing Mindfulness and Self-awareness in Children with Disorders of Executive Function, a joint conference of the Univ. of California - Irvine Dept. of Pediatrics, The Center for Autism & Neurodevelopmental Disorders, the Chapman University Abilities Project, the Orange County Health Care Agency, and the Orange County Dept. of Education, Costa Mesa, California.

Diamond, A. (to be presented Feb. 25, 26, 27 or 28, 2015). The caring relationship between the teacher and the children. Invited talk, 20th National Montessori Congress in Mexico: The Art of Educating, Puebla, Mexico.

Diamond, A. (to be presented March 7, 2015). Title: tba. Invited talk, Pacific Northwest Neuropsychological Society, Seattle, WA.

Diamond, A. (to be presented April 17 or 18, 2015). Research insights into promoting the well-being of children and their families. Invited Keynote Address, Mindful Families, Schools & Communities: Research-to-Practice Promoting Child Well-being meeting, Seattle, WA.

Diamond, A. (to be presented April 20, 2015). Executive functions in children and teenagers. Invited talk, 4th Annual Grand Erie District School Board Professional Student Services Personnel Conference, Brantford, ON.

Diamond, A. (to be presented May 8, 2015). Title: tba. Invited talk,  Friday Forum, Portland City Club, Portland, OR.

Diamond, A. (to be presented May 18, 2015). Interrelations of executive functions with emotional, social, and physical health. Invited Keynote Address,  Developmental Behavioral Disorders & a Spectrum of Pediatric Challenges meeting, Hilton Head Island, SC.

Diamond, A. (to be presented May 26-30, 2015). Title: tba. Invited talk, American College of Sports Medicince (ACSM) meeting,  San Diego, CA.

Diamond, A. (to be presented May 28, 2015). Title: tba. Invited talk, Psychology Dept. Colloquium, Univ. of California - San Diego, CA.

Diamond, A. (to be presented July 2, 3 or 4, 2015). Title: tba. Invited talk, 11th International Conference of Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), Toulouse, France.

Diamond, A. (to be presented sometime between Aug. 2 - 16, 2015). The importance of dance, music, and other related activities for the development of children. Invited talk, 'Education for Social Change: Innovative Solutions' Conference, Educateurs sans Frontières, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

Diamond, A. (to be presented Sept. 5, 2015). Title: tba. Invited Keynote Address, Economic Science Association (ESA) European Meeting, Heidelberg, Germany.

Talks

Diamond, A. (Nov. 22, 2014). Executive functions: What they are, why they’re important, and how to improve them . Invited Keynote Address, Cerebrum Conference, Lima, Peru.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 22, 2014). Some ways to assess executive functions. Invited workshop, Cerebrum Conference, Lima, Peru.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 14, 2014). Strategies and activities for aiding the development of executive functions in children. Invited Keynote Address, Early Childhood Education Conference, IDEA Institute, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 14, 2014). Two particularly wise educational approaches: Tools of the Mind and Montessori. Invited workshop, Early Childhood Education Conference, IDEA Institute, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 11, 12 and 13, 2014). Invited to teach a set of four 2-hour evening classes (three for Nascira Ramia and one for David Landsdale), IDEA Institute, Universidad San Francisco de Quito, Ecuador. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 6, 2014). Recent insights from neuroscience and developmental science. Invited talk, Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School International Baccalaureate (IB) ) Year 2 IBeyond Conference, Vancouver BC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 1, 2014). Strategies and activities for aiding the development of executive functions. Invited talk, Centre for ADHD Awareness, Canada (CADDAC) Conference, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 29, 2014). Benefits of the arts and physical activity for the brain. Invited talk, Mini Med School (MMS), Child and Family Research Institute, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 21, 2014). Pros and cons of NIMH’s research domain criteria (RDoC) for helping children with executive function deficits. Invited Keynote Address, 2014 Research Forum, American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 19, 2014). What abilities and skills will be needed for success in the 21st century? Invited talk, Montessori Training Centre of San Diego, CA.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 7, 2014). Some thoughts on how we might better help more children to thrive. Invited talk, Individual U, New York, NY.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 2, 2014). What executive functions are, why they’re important, and ways to improve them in young children. Invited Keynote Address, Symposium on 'Creativity, Flexibility, Self-Control, and Discipline: Building Executive Function Skills in Young Children: Practice & Policy ', Lipsitt-Duchin lecture series co-sponsored by Brown University and Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Brown U., Providence, RI.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 1, 2014). Unintended consequences of seemingly rational actions: Often what produces the best short-term outcomes is different from what produces the best long-term outcomes. Invited talk to White House staff, Washington, DC.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 29, 2014). Not losing sight of the goal of any mindfulness practice. Invited talk, Mindfulness & Learning Research Symposium, Johns Hopkins Science of Learning Institute, Baltimore, MD.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 27, 2014). New findings about the brain are turning some ideas on their head. Invited TEDx talk, TEDxWestVancouverED: Rethinking Education, West Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 12, 2014). Interventions, programs, and approaches that appear promising for improving executive functions and those that, despite much hype, do not. Invited Keynote Address, FLUX Integrative Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

Diamond, A. (August 21, 2014). Child development and the brain: Insights into reducing social inequalities and helping every child thrive. Invited talk, Interdisciplinary Research in Education Conference, Santiago, Chile.

Diamond, A. (August 9, 2014). What do we know about the brain that can help inform early childhood programs? Invited talk, Pacific Early Childhood Education Research Association (PECERA) Conference, Bali, Indonesia.

Diamond, A. (June 26, 2014). Leveraging what we’ve learned from research to help every child succeed: Why the arts, play, and physical activity aid cognitive development. Invited talk, ‘Jean Piaget Conference: Theories of Development’ in honor of the 40th anniversary of the Archives Jean Piaget, Université de Genève, Switzerland.

Diamond, A. (June 11, 2014). Principles and strategies for improving executive function skills. Invited webinar, Annie E Casey Foundation.
video: www.devcogneuro.com/videos/principles_and_strategies_for_improving_executive_function_skills.mp4

Diamond, A. (May 28, 2014). What executive functions are and factors that affect them. Invited Plenary Address, 17th Annual Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC) of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Washington, DC.

Diamond, A. (May 20, 2014). Neurochemical modulation of, and environmental interventions to improve, executive functions. Invited talk, Joint Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour / Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Workshop on ‘Enhancing Executive Functions in Education,’ Nijmegen, NL.

Diamond, A. (May 19, 2014). How executive functions foster educational development: Insights from today and perspectives on the future. Invited talk, 'How Executive Functions Foster Educational Development' Conference, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, Nijmegen, NL.

Diamond, A. (May 16, 2014). Interrelations between motor and cognitive development: Development of executive functions. Invited Keynote Address, ‘Inspiring Infancy: Interrelations between Sensory, Motor, and Cognitive Abilities During Typical and Atypical Development’ Conference, Groningen University, NL.

Diamond, A. (May 14, 2014). Executive functions: Practical insights from neuroscience and developmental science for helping children. Invited talk, Center for Human Movement Sciences, Groningen University, NL.

Diamond, A. (May 10, 2014). Invited Roundtable Participant, Bending the Knotted Oak: Music Therapy and Music Cognition Research in Management of Neurological Disorders, UBC Peter Wall International Research Roundtable, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (April 23, 2014). Part 3 of 3. Invited talk, Neuropsychiatry Grand Rounds, UBC Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (April 16, 2014). Part 2 of 3. Invited talk, Neuropsychiatry Grand Rounds, UBC Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (March 26, 2014). Frontal lobe and executive functions. Invited Lecture, Neuroscience Graduate Course (501) Module on Disorders of Cognition, Communication and Emotion, UBC Faculty of Medicine, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (March 22, 2014). Environmental and biological effects on prefrontal cortex and executive functions. Invited talk,  Butters-Kaplan West Coast Neuropsychology Conference, San Diego, CA.

Diamond, A. (March 15, 2014). Invited talk, Mother and Baby Prison Health: Making Prison Mother Baby Units work in Canada, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (March 13, 2014). Invited talk, ‘Brain Matters! Vancouver: Brain Science and Social Responsibility’ Conference, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 18, 2014). The importance of play. Invited talk, Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 17, 2014). All day (6-hour) Invited Presentation. Brainy Bunch, Napa, CA.

Diamond, A. (Dec. 15, 2013 to Jan. 7, 2014). Cognitive, social, and emotional development in cross-cultural and biological perspective. Visiting Professor. Invited 4-week course. Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 27, 2013). Toward a major paradigm shift in how we treat our patients, Part 1 of 3. Invited talk, Neuropsychiatry Grand Rounds, UBC Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 21, 2013). Executive functions: What they are, genetic and environmental influences and clinical implication. Invited talk, St. Paul’s Hospital Continuing Medical Education Conference for Primary Care Physicians, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 20, 2013). What do children need most?, Invited Featured Speaker, Cities Fit for Children Provincial Summit Pre-Conference: A special evening for parents and caregivers, Surrey, BC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 13, 2013). Understanding the roles of traditional activities and of ‘executive function’ abilities in nurturing strong, healthy citizens and communities. Invited talk, Ktunaxa Nation Council Call to Gather Meeting, Cranbrook, BC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 04, 2013). Keynote Address. 103rd Arizona Town Hall, Grand Canyon, AZ.
the presentation was included as an appendix to the town hall final report: www.aztownhall.org/Resources/Documents/103rd_Final_Recommendations_Report_Early_Ed.PDF
video of news program: www.azpbs.org/arizonahorizon/detailvid.php?id=14665

Diamond, A. (Oct. 25, 2013). Want excellent academic achievement? Simple, just nourish the human spirit. Invited talk, 13th International Meeting in Preschool and Early Education, Monterrey, Mexico. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 20, 2013). Neuroscience research and Montessori, Presentation 3: What nourishes the human spirit may also be best for executive functions and school outcomes. Invited talk. Canadian Council of Montessori Administrators Annual Conference and Retreat – “Mindful Montessori”, Richmond Hill, ON. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 20, 2013). Neuroscience research and Montessori, Presentation 2: The neuroscience of executive functions, including sex differences. Invited talk, Canadian Council of Montessori Administrators Annual Conference and Retreat – “Mindful Montessori”, Richmond Hill, ON. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 20, 2013). Neuroscience research and Montessori, Presentation 1: What children need most and why executive functions are important. Invited talk, Canadian Council of Montessori Administrators Annual Conference and Retreat – “Mindful Montessori”, Richmond Hill, ON. Continuing Education credit provided.

Ling, D., Wong, C., & Diamond, A. (Oct. 18, 2013). Double dissociation: Integrating color/ shape aids conditional discrimination but separating them aids card sorting in 3-year-olds. Poster presented at the Cognitive Development Society Meeting, Memphis, TN.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 19, 2013). What we know about child development & the brain to help us nurture body, spirit, & mind: Part 2. Invited workshop, It’s Child Play and it Matters Annual Conference, Lindsay, ON. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 18, 2013). What we know about child development & the brain to help us nurture body, spirit, & mind: Part 1. Invited workshop, It’s Child Play and it Matters Annual Conference, Lindsay, ON. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 10, 2013). Development of executive functions. Invited plenary session, Annual meeting of the European Society of Pediatric Research, Porto, Portugal. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 30, 2013). The executive functions dependent on prefrontal cortex: Genetic and environmental influences and clinical implications. Invited talk, NeuroDevNet Brain Development Conference, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Aug. 26 & 27, 2013). Executive functions 101 for early educators: Nurturing creativity, curiosity, reasoning, self-control, discipline, and self-confidence. Invited talk – talk repeated on two days, First Things First Early Childhood Summit. Phoenix, AZ. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Aug 2, 2013). Neuroscience (and psychology) research and Montessori. Invited talk. AMI International Montessori Congress, Portland, OR. Continuing Education credit provided.
PowerPoint: http://montessoricongress.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/Montessori-Congress-Portland-2013.pdf
Video: www.devcogneuro.com/videos/circus_music_dance_v3.wmv

Diamond, A. (to be presented July 31, 2013). Invited talk, Trust for Learning Trust Funders' Collaborative Meeting, Portland, OR.

Conference Organizer, 4th Conference. Brain development and learning, Vancouver, BC, 2013, July 24-28, 2013

Diamond, A. (June 20, 2013). Self-regulation and executive functions. Invited talk. Centre for Advanced Study of Teaching & Learning (CASTL) and SRCD working meeting, Charlottesville, VA.

Diamond, A. (May 31, 2013). Understanding executive functions: Strategies for supporting each student in realizing his or her potential and for preventing deficits. Invited talk. Meeting of the International Mind, Brain, and Education Society, Quito, Ecuador. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (May 17, 2013). Leveraging what we've learned from brain research to help every child succeed. Keynote Address. Northwest Cognitive and Memory Conference, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, BC.

Ling, D., Wong, C., & Diamond, A. (May 17, 2013). Young children benefit from more time when performing the Day-Night task. Talk presented by Cole Wong. Northwest Cognition and Memory Conference, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, BC.

Ling, D., Wong, C. & Diamond, A. (May 17, 2013). Double dissociation: Integrating color/shape aids conditional discrimination but separating them aids card sorting in 3½-yr-olds. Talk presented by Daphne Ling. Northwest Cognition and Memory Conference, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, BC.

Diamond, A. (May 17, 2013). Child development and the brain: Promoting resilience and joy. Invited webinar. The Clinic Technical Assistance Center (CTAC), New York State Mental Health Clinic via webinar. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (May 10, 2013). Cultivating the mind. Invited talk. Heart-Mind 2013: Helping Children Thrive, Vancouver, BC.
Video: dalailamacenter.org/heart-mind-2013-helping-children-thrive/heart-mind-2013-presenters/adele-diamond
Video: www.devcogneuro.com/videos/adele_diamond_NW.mov

Diamond, A. (April 30, 2013). Bright young minds: Early learning, play and executive functions. Invited talk. ParentMap, Seattle, WA. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. ( Apr 27, 2013). Executive functions and prefrontal cortex: Genetic and neurochemical influences, gender differences, and novel methods to help children become masters of their own behavior. Invited talk. UBC Neuroscience Retreat, Whistler, BC.

Diamond, A. (April 20, 2013). Symposium: Controlling actions and acting together: Bidirectional links between executive function and social interaction in development. Invited discussant.  Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, WA.

Ling, D., Wong, C., & Diamond, A. (April 19, 2013). Young children benefit from extra time when performing tasks requiring inhibitory control. Poster presentation. Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, WA.

Diamond, A. (April 18, 2013). Symposium: Executive function: Basic science to intervention. Invited discussant.  Society for Research in Child Development, Seattle, WA.

Diamond, A. (April 12, 2013). Workshop: The role of prefrontal cortex and neurodevelopmental disorders. Invited workshop. 2nd Annual Symposium on Community-based Social Pediatrics, Montreal, QC.

Diamond, A. (April 11, 2013). Round Table: Evidence based on the impact of toxic stress. Invited roundtable participant. 2nd Annual Symposium on Community-based Social Pediatrics, Montreal, QC.

Diamond, A. (March 25, 2013). Invited Lecture. Neuroscience Graduate Course (501) Module on Disorders of Cognition, Communication and Emotion, UBC Faculty of Medicine, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (March 22, 2013). Insights from neuroscience and developmental science to help every child succeed. Invited talk. Gertrude Weigum Hinsz Lecture, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND.

Diamond, A. (March 11, 2013). What will it likely take to be successful in the 21st century? Invited webinar. Mind, Brain, Health and Education Psych 1609 course, Harvard University via webinar. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (March 7, 2013). What can we do to help every child shine? Keynote Address. Educare Learning Network’s Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ.
video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTtYCE2QLuQ

Diamond, A. (March 5, 2013). Listen. Relax. Love. Enjoy. Exercise. Invited talk. Connect Health Centre for Integrative Medicine, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Feb 25, 2013). Creating effective formal and informal learning communities. Invited one-hour workshop. Nanaimo District Teachers’ Association Professional Development (Pro-D) Day, Dover Bay Secondary School, Nanaimo, BC.

Diamond, A. (Feb 25, 2013). Child development and the brain: Insights to help every child thrive. Keynote. Nanaimo District Teachers’ Association Professional Development (Pro-D) Day, Dover Bay Secondary School, Nanaimo, BC. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb 21, 2013). Measures of executive function. Invited workshop. Washington State Dept. of Early Learning, Seattle, WA. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb 21, 2013). Reducing stress in children’s lives and giving them tools to better manage stress. Invited workshop. Washington State Dept. of Early Learning, Seattle, WA. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb 19, 2013). Interventions shown to aid executive function development in children 4-12 years old. Invited talk. EdBag session - a PIER brown bag lunch series, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.

Diamond, A. (Feb 18, 2013). Applying what we know from neuroscience and developmental science to how schools can enhance EFs development and academic achievement in their students. Invited talk. Program for Interdisciplinary Educational Research (PIER) Research Speaker Series, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 8, 2013). Cultivating the mind: How to improve self-regulation, creativity and problem-solving in children. Invited 3-hour workshop. Sea to Sky Teachers' (District 48) Professional Development (Pro-D) Day, Whistler Secondary School, Whistler, BC. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 7, 2013). Insights from neuroscience and developmental science to help you succeed in university and the job market. Invited talk. Quest University, Squamish, BC.

Diamond, A. (Dec. 13, 2012). What we can do to help every child shine. Invited talk. Montessori Institute of San Diego, CA.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 29, 2012). Benefits of exercise for success in school and career: How important are the social, emotional, and cognitive aspects of physical activity for these benefits? Invited talk. Pease Family Scholar Lecture, Iowa State University, Ames, IA.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 27, 2012). Executive functions: Genetic and neurochemical influences, clinical implications, gender differences, and promising interventions. Invited talk. Interdiscipinary Graduate Program in Neuroscience, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 19, 2012). Leveraging knowledge about brain science & developmental science to help every child thrive. Invited talk. Montessori Professional Development Day, Tyee Elementary School, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 26, 2012). Effects of physical activity, and type of physical activity, on cognitive control. Keynote. ‘Key Issues in Childhood Physical Activity Science,' 7th European Youth Heart Study Scientific Symposium: , Madeira, Portugal. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 24, 2012). Helping children become masters of their own behavior: Novel methods for improving cognitive control. Invited address. “Conference on International Thoughts on Mind and Brain,” The Gonda Center for Multidisciplinary Brain Research, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan, Israel. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 21, 2012). The effects of stress and genotype on prefrontal cortex and executive functions and how those effects differ in males and females. Invited talk. Ben Gurion University. Beer-Sheva, Israel.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 13, 2012). Afternoon talk: Leveraging what we’ve learned from research to help every child succeed: Strategies and activities to aid the development of executive functions. Second of 2 Invited talks. 5th Annual Family Information Session on Executive Function: Development and Facilitation in Children With Focus on Deaf/Hard of Hearing, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, Washington.
PowerPoint: devcogneuro.com/Publications/Diamond_2012_seattle_children_hospital_Development_of_Executive_Functions.pdf

Diamond, A. (Oct. 13, 2012). Morning talk: Understanding executive functions. First of 2 Invited talks. 5th Annual Family Information Session on Executive Function: Development and Facilitation in Children with a Focus on Deaf/Hard of Hearing, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, Washington.
PowerPoint: www.devcogneuro.com/Publications/Diamond_2012_seattle_children_hospital_Understanding_Executive_Functions.pdf
Video: youtube.com/watch?v=rWBn9LOHjzA&index=5&list=PLTMQncsWPsq0AWUDtitolyokayUJ0-04I

Diamond, Oberlander, T., Grunau, R., Brain, U., Chau, C., Diamond, A. (Oct 3, 2012). Prenatal serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) antidepressant exposure and serotonin transporter promoter genotype (SLC6A4) influence executive functions at 6 years of age. Invited talk. International Biennial Congress of the Marcé Society, Paris, France.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 7, 2012). What executive functions are and ways to improve them in young children. Invited talk. “Early Education: Interventions and interactions to promote social and cognitive development,” IVth IAB International Seminar, São Paulo, Brazil. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Aug. 29, 2012). Leveraging knowledge about brain development and developmental science to help every child thrive. Keynote. “Researching Development, Learning and Well-Being in Early Childhood,” Biennial Meeting of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Utrecht, Netherlands. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Aug. 26, 2012). What is key to teaching children so they flourish. Keynote. Association Montessori Internationale (AMI), Amsterdam, Netherlands. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Aug. 19, 2012). Leveraging what we’ve learned from developmental and neuroscience research to help every child succeed. Invited talk. First Things First Presummit Symposium on School Readiness, Phoenix, AZ. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (July 9, 2012). Leveraging what we’ve learned from research to help every child succeed: What executive functions are, and strategies and activities to aid their development. Invited talk. Board on Children, Youth, & Families. National Academies of Sciences Planning Meeting. Washington, DC.

Diamond, A. (June 12, 2012). Child development and the brain: Insights to help every child thrive. Invited talk. Garrison Institute, New York, NY.
view online: www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQ_j1mjGLow

Diamond, A. (June 8, 2012). Understanding executive functions and their developmental course. Invited talk. Whole Day Workshop. District Professional Development Day, Ottawa-Carleton District School Board, Ottawa, ON.

Diamond, A. (June 8, 2012). Prefrontal cortex dysfunction in developmental neuropsychological disorders & how to assess executive functions in young children. Invited talk. Whole Day Workshop. District Professional Development Day, Ottawa-Carleton District School Board, Ottawa, ON.

Diamond, A. (June 8, 2012). Leveraging knowledge about brain development to help every child succeed: Programs and activities empirically demonstrated to aid executive function development in young children. Invited talk. Whole Day Workshop. District Professional Development Day, Ottawa-Carleton District School Board, Ottawa, ON.

Diamond, A. (May 30, 2012). The roles of the arts and physical activity in the development of executive functions. Invited talk. Jean Piaget Preconference on Contemplative Developmental Science, Toronto, ON.

Organizer & Chair of Symposium, Diverse methods of facilitating cognitive development (including implications for how we think about cognition and its relation to play, movement, art, etc.), Jean Piaget Society Annual Meeting, Toronto, ON, May 29, 2012

Diamond, A. (May 18, 2012). What nourishes the human spirit may also be best for executive functions. Invited talk. Psychiatry Grand Rounds, St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (May 11, 2012). Executive functions: Expanding the boundaries of our knowledge and using that to prevent disorders and help children. Invited talk. Research Day Symposium, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB. Continuing Education credits provided.

Thomas, J.P., Oberlander, T.F, Synnes, A., Diamond, A., Chau, C., Grunau, R. (April 28, 2012). Infant focused attention predicts attention and executive functions in very preterm children at 7 years. Poster presentation. Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.

Chau, C., Doesburg, S., Cheung, T., Ribary, U., Herdman, T., Moiseev, A., Cepeda, I., Diamond, A., Synnes, A.,Miller, S.P., Grunau, R.E. (April 28, 2012). Executive functions are related to altered magnetoencephalographic spectral structure in school-age children born very preterm. Poster presentation. Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.

Oberlander, T., Grunau, R., Brain, U., Chau, C., Diamond, A. (April 28, 2012). Prenatal serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) andidepressant exposure and serotonin transporter promotor genotype (SLC6A4) influence executive functions at 6 years of age. Poster presentation. Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 28, 2012). How can we improve children’s executive functions, and how much would that help children? Invited talk. Workshop entitled “Developmental cognitive neuroscience: A forward look,” London, UK.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 26, 2012). Commonalities across diverse approaches shown to improve executive functions in young children. Invited talk. 3rd UK Paediatric Neuropsychology Symposium, London, UK. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 23, 2012). Development of executive functions during early childhood and their modulation by genes and environment. Invited talk. 3rd UK Paediatric Neuropsychology Symposium, London, UK. Continuing Education credits provided.
view online: web.archive.org/web/20120615140724/http://www.ucl.ac.uk/neuropsych/InternationalSymposia

Diamond, A. (April 20, 2012). Executive functions and prefrontal cortex: Genetic and neurochemical influences, gender differences, and novel methods to help children become masters of their own behavior. Invited talk. Zangwill Lecture. Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, UK.

Diamond, A. (March 23, 2012). Invited lecture. Neuroscience Graduate Course (501) Module on Learning and Memory, UBC Faculty of Medicine, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (March 22, 2012). How and why dance, music, sports, and storytelling might well support critical cognitive development in children and youth. Invited talk. BrainTalks series at Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 24, 2012) Executive functions: Genetic & neurochemical influences, gender differences, & strategies to help their development. Invited Talk. Adele Diamond Symposium, Department of Psychology, Leiden University, Netherlands.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 21, 2012). Afternoon talk: Leveraging knowledge about brain development to help every child succeed: Programs and activities empirically demonstrated to aid executive function development. Fourth of Four Invited talks. Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 21, 2012). Morning talk: Executive functions: Genetic & neurochemical influences, gender differences, and interrelations of executive functions with emotions, and social and bodily needs. Third of Four Invited talks. Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 20, 2012). Afternoon talk: Ways to assess and study executive functions in young children. Second of Four Invited talks. Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 20, 2012). Morning talk: Understanding executive functions and their developmental course. First of Four Invited talks. Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 17, 2012). Executive functions: Insights into genetic and neurochemical influences, gender differences, and strategies to help their development. Plenary Address. Special Symposium at Leiden University in Honor of Prof. Leo de Sonneville, Leiden, Netherlands.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 8, 2012). What we can do to help all children thrive. Invited Public Lecture. UBC / Canada Foundation for Innovation Dialogues in connection with the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) meeting, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 3, 2012). Why the arts, play, and physical activity aid brain development and the development of skills critical for success in school and in life. Invited talk. Department of Psychiatry Grand Rounds, Seattle Children’s Hospital and the University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 30, 2012). Effects of physical activity on executive functions. Invited talk. Research Unit for Sport, Health and Civic Society, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 29, 2012). What the evidence shows improves executive functions and academic outcomes. Invited Address. TrygFonden Multi-disciplinary Symposium, "Improving the well-being of children and youth,” Copenhagen, Denmark.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 26, 2012). Nourishing the body, spirit and mind: How to improve self-control, creativity and problem solving in children. Invited public talk. sponsored by the Dalai Lama Centre, Vancity Theatre, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 20, 2012). The importance of repeated practice. Invited workshop. Early Childhood Education Research Forum, Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE), Towson, MD.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 20, 2012). Executive functioning. Keynote. Early Childhood Education Research Forum, Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE), Towson, MD. Continuing Education credits provided.
video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0W8Y9l1toE

Diamond, A. (Dec. 2, 2011). Why tools of the mind and montessori educational approaches may be particularly efficacious for developing executive function skills. Invited talk. An Inaugural Speaker in Visiting Distinguished Scholar Program, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute & School of Medicine, Roanoke, VA.
video: research.vtc.vt.edu/events/2011/dec/01/why-tools-of-the-mind/
slides: static.vtc.vt.edu/pdf/diamond_vtcri_public

Diamond, A. (Dec. 1, 2011). Executive functions and prefrontal cortex: Genetic and neurochemical influences, gender differences, and practical activities and approaches to helps. Invited research lecture. Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute & School of Medicine, Roanoke, VA
pdf: static.vtc.vt.edu/pdf/diamond_vtcri_public.pdf

Diamond, A. (Nov. 17, 2011). Effects of exercise on cognitive control: What is cognitive control and how important are the social, emotional, & cognitive aspects of physical activity? Invited talk. American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Conference on Physical Activity, Cognitive Function, and Academic Achievement, Washington, DC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 15, 2011). Invited informal talk. World Bank Global Partnership for Education, Washington, DC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 11, 2011). Pets can provide emotional, social, physical, and cognitive benefits. Invited talk. Social Neuroscience of Human-Animal Interactions Workshop, Washington, DC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 10, 2011). Understanding executive functions: Strategies for supporting students’ development and preventing deficits. Invited full-day workshop. Annual School Psychology Conference, Jewish Vocational Services, Toronto, ON.
Continuing Education credits provided

Diamond, A. (Nov. 5, 2011). Why disciplining the mind, reducing stress & loneliness, and increasing joy may be critical for children's academic success. Invited talk. Education Symposium. Garrison Institue, Garrison, NY.
view online:www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wdFKPTEL2M

Diamond, A. (Oct. 31, 2011). Insights from developmental cognitive neuroscience on ways to improve executive functions in young children and why that’s important. Invited talk. Inductive Development Systems Theory Conference, Penn. State University, University Park, PA.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 29, 2011). Why the most effective and efficient strategy for educating the mind is to also educate the heart and body. Invited address. Cross-Cultural Symposium on Early Childhood Education: Educating the Heart, Body and Mind, Richmond, BC.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 22, 2011). Insights into ways of improving cognitive control and self-regulation in young children. Invited address. 37th Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology, Minneapolis, MN.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 19, 2011). Commonalities among programs that have shown great promise in working with ASD children. Invited talk. Simons Initiative on Autism and the Brain. MIT, Cambridge, MA

Diamond, A. (Sep. 24, 2011). Applying what we know from scientific research in developmental cognitive neuroscience to how schools can enhance executive function development in young children. Invited talk. New York Academy of Sciences 2nd Annual Aspen Brain Forum - Conference on the Cognitive Neuroscience of Learning and Education, Aspen, CO.

Organizer (2011). 2nd Annual Aspen Brain Forum, Conference on the Cognitive Neuroscience of Learning and Education, Aspen, CO, Sept. 24, 2011.

Diamond, A. (Aug. 23, 2011). Commonalities across diverse non-computerized approaches that have shown promise in improving children’s executive functions. Invited talk. International Workshop on Cognitive and Working Memory Training, University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL), College Park, MD.

Diamond, A (Aug. 19, 2011). Executive Functions defined. Invited talk. Symposium at the American Youth Circus Organization's Biennial Meeting, Sarasota, FL.

Diamond, A. (June 30, 2011). Development, neurochemical modulation, and environmental interventions to improve inhibition of thought and action. Invited talk. Frijda lecture. Cognitive Science Centre Amsterdam (CSCA) Summer School, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Diamond, A. (June 30, 2011). Relation of intention to action: Development of inhibitory control and interventions to help. Invited 3-hour workshop. Cognitive Science Center Amsterdam (CSCA) Summer School, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (June 8, 2011). Executive Functions: What they are, why they're important, and how to aid their development. Invited talk. Presentation for kindergarten teachers, Vancouver School Board Education Centre. Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (June 2, 2011). Aspects of Executive function. Invited talk. Mindfulness Meditation Research Day Meeting, Toronto, ON. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (May 20, 2011). What do we know about child development and the brain that can help promote resilience and help more children be strong and joyful? Invited talk. 22nd Boston Trauma Conference, Boston, MA. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (May 13, 2011). Executive Functions: Insights from Neuroscience and Developmental Psychology. Invited talk. Hershey Montessori Farm School, Huntsburgh, OH.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 28, 2011). Why focusing on only academic achievement or only executive functions might not be enough. Invited talk. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 20, 2011). What nourishes the human spirit may also be best for executive functions. Invited talk. Neuropsychiatry Program Grand Rounds, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 11, 2011). Leveraging knowledge about brain development to help every child succeed. Invited talk. Centennial Academy, Montreal, QC.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 11, 2011). Insights from Neuroscience and Developmental Science to help every child succeed. Invited talk. Logan Lecture, Centennial Academy, Montreal, QC.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 28, 2011). Insights from neuroscience and developmental science on ways to improve cognitive control and self-regulation in young children and why that’s important. Invited talk. Montessori Training Center, Minneapolis, MN.

Diamond, A. (March 9, 2011). Frontal lobe and executive functions. A lecture in module 3: Learning and Memory. Neuroscience 501, UBC.

Diamond, A. (March 4, 2011). Teaching, & raising children, for creativity and fulfillment. Keynote. The Roeper School, Bloomfield Hills, MI.

Diamond, A. (March 3, 2011). Training the brain: Improving attention & self-regulation. Invited speaker. Pickering Lecture in Development Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 28, 2011). Possible neural bases of gender differences in higher cognitive functions. Invited talk. NIH/NIMH Sex Differences in Brain, Behavior, Mental Health and Mental Disorders Workshop, Rockville, MD.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 22, 2011). The development of executive functions in children and adolescents. Invited talk. Professional Day, Ethical Culture Fieldston School, New York City, NY.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 17, 2011). Why study executive functions? Invited talk. Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Workshop on Behavior, Bethesda, MD.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 8, 2011). Love grows brains and shapes gene expression. Invited address. Seeds of Empathy Aboriginal meeting. Comox, BC.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 8, 2011). What executive functions are, and strategies and activities for aiding its development. Invited address. Seeds of Empathy Aboriginal meeting. Comox, BC.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 4, 2011). Strategies and activities for aiding the development of executive functions in young children. Invited talk. Child Guidance Centre, Sahyadri Specialty Hospital, Pune, India. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Dec. 24, 2010). Invited Valedictory Address, Conference on Science, Spirituality, and Education, presided over by the Dalai Lama, to advise the Government of Sikkim in its endeavor to overhaul the provincial education system so that they educate not only the head but also the heart, in Gangtok, Sikkim, India.

Diamond, A. (Dec. 23, 2010). Insights from neuroscience, psychology, and teaching into how to educate the heart, & not only the head. Invited Address, Conference on Science, Spirituality, and Education, presided over by the Dalai Lama, to advise the Government of Sikkim in its endeavor to overhaul the provincial education system so that they educate not only the head but also the heart, in Gangtok, Sikkim, India.

Diamond, A. (Dec. 14, 2010). Development of the executive functions dependent on prefrontal cortex: Genetic and neurochemical influences, and possible interventions to help children. Invited talk. Brains and Behaviors Program, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 9, 2010). Strategies and activities for aiding the development of executive functions in young children. Invited talk. British Columbia Association of School Psychologists (BCASP) Conference, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 9, 2010). Prefrontal cortex and executive functions: What School Psychologists might need to know. Invited talk. British Columbia Association of School Psychologists (BCASP) Conference, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 6, 2010). How the arts and play may aid human brain development. Invited speaker, Body Worlds & The Brain exhibit at Science World, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 4, 2010). Prefrontal cortex and executive function development for K-12 educators. Invited plenary address, Making Connections Conference organized by UBC School Psychology Program, Richmond, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 28, 2010). Help millions, save billions: Invest wisely in early childhood to improve mental health. Invited speaker, Open Minds Across Canada Mental Health Symposia, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 22, 2010). Executive functions in children and youth: How and why dance or storytelling might well support the development of these cognitive abilities? Invited talk. Conference on Childhood and Society, Bregenz, Austria. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 19, 2010). The development of executive functions: Surprising ways in which children and adults are similar and different, and surprising interconnections between emotional, social, and physical well-being and executive function development. Invited lecture, Center for Lifespan Psychology Lecture Series, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 22, 2010). Executive functions and prefrontal cortex: Genetic and neurochemical influences, clinical implications, and possible interventions to help. Invited speaker, Jane Holmes Bernstein Lecture in Developmental Neuropsychology, Psychiatry Grand Rounds, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 17, 2010). Evolution of how children’s minds change as they grow up, and environmental & biological influences on that. Invited 2-hour applied talk on neuropsychology for FRIENDS program trainers (an anxiety prevention program), Ministry of Children & Family Development, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Sep.11, 2010). Genetic influences on prefrontal function and gender differences in that. Invited speaker, Workshop on the Computational Properties of the Prefrontal Cortex (PFC), Whistler, BC.

Conference Organizer, 3rd Biennial Conference. Brain development and learning: Making sense of the science, Vancouver, BC, 2010, July 16-20, 2010

Diamond, A. (June 26, 2010). Want to improve children's emotional and mental health? Consider an activity that requires discipline, sustained attention, and exercise. Invited speaker, “Paediatric Update”, Annual Canadian Paediatric Society Meeting, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.
view online: www.cps.ca/English/ProEdu/OnlineEdu.htm

Diamond, A. (June 19, 2010). Possible ways to prevent or remediate executive function deficits during childhood, adolescence, and emerging adulthood. Invited speaker, 2010 Mind & Life Summer Research Institute, Garrison Institute, New York. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (June 1, 2010). Why the arts are important for the development of children prepared to succeed in school and in life. Invited talk. Center for Integrated Arts Education Institute, Greeley, CO. Continuing Education credits provided.

Herman, D., Mass, C., Landa, R., and Diamond, A. (May 20, 2010). Performance by children with ASD, developmental delay, and typical development on delayed non-matched to sample task. Poster presentation. International Meeting for Autism Research (IMAR), Philadelphia, PA.

Diamond, A. (May 17, 2010). What should an intelligent audience interested in a societal commitment to the early years know about prefrontal cortex development? Invited talk. Council for Early Child Development, Toronto, ON

Diamond, A. (May 7, 2010). The effects of exercise on cognitive control: How important are the social, emotional, and cognitive aspects of the physical activity? Invited talk. 3rd International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, Toronto, ON

Diamond, A. (May 3, 2010). Preschool program improves cognitive control. Invited talk in a NIDA Workshop on “Interventions Targeted at Improving Cognitive Control,” Rockville, MD. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 30, 2010). Coming full circle from the social end of psychology, to the neuroscience end, and back again. Invited talk. Annual Meeting for the Society of Experimental Psychologists, Philadelphia, PA.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 16, 2010). Insights into selective attention, task switching, and response inhibition. Invited talk. International Workshop on “Selection and Control Mechanisms in Perception and Action,” Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 10, 2010). Why executive functions are important and how to aid their development. Keynote. Annual General Meeting, Association Montessori Internationale, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 26, 2010). Development of executive functions in preschool and school-age children. Invited talk. 20th Annual Butters-Kaplan West Coast Neuropsychological Conference, San Diego, CA. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 19, 2010). The executive functions dependent on prefrontal cortex: Genetic and environmental influences and educational and clinical implications. Keynote. Royce Conference, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.

Diamond, A. (Mar, 17, 2010). Genetic and environmental influences on the expression of cognitive abilities dependent on prefrontal cortex. Invited lecture, Neuroscience Graduate Course (501) Module on Learning and Memory, UBC Faculty of Medicine, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Mar . 9, 2010). Development of cognitive functions dependent on prefrontal cortex, and genetic and environmental influences. Invited talk. Javits Research Symposium, organized by Department of Education, National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, and National Association for Gifted Children, Washington, DC

Diamond, A. (Feb. 26, 2010). Prefrontal cortex and education: Direct relevance of scientific discoveries to educational practice. Invited talk. The Curry Education Research Lectureship Series, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA. Continuing Education credits provided.
listen online: teis.virginia.edu/research-mainmenu-55/2533-education-research-lectureship-series-adele-diamond

Diamond, A. (Feb. 11, 2010). Resonating with Robbie Case and continuing his legacy: Current approaches to optimizing all aspects of a child’s development. Invited talk. Robbie Case Memorial Lecture, Institute of Child Study, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
view online: mediaspace.oise.utoronto.ca:8888/tinkerne/2010CaseLecture.mov

Diamond, A. (Jan. 20, 2010). Insights from neuroscience and developmental science for elementary school teachers. Invited talk, Waverley Elementary School. Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Dec. 17, 2009). Prefrontal cortex and early child development. Invited talk. Meeting on Early Childhood Education, Academia Brasileira de Ciencias (the Brazilian National Academy of Sciences), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Diamond, A. (Dec. 5, 2009). What executive functions are, why they're important, and ways to improve them in young children. Invited talk, Conference on Cultivating Human Capital, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 29, 2009) Invited talk. Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa.

Diamond, A. (Nov.24, 2009). Very little is fixed or unchangeable. Invited talk. Phoenix Academy of Learning, Vancouver.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 13, 2009). Cognitive control and self-regulation in young children: Ways to improve that and why. Keynote. Conference on “School Readiness and School Success: From research to policy and practice,” co-sponsored by the Strategic Knowledge Cluster on Early Child Development and the Centre of Excellence for Early Childhood Development, Quebec City, QC. Continuing Education credits provided.
view online: www.skc-ecd.ca/conferences/ready-for-school-ready-for-life.html

Diamond, A. (Nov. 6, 2009). Prefrontal cortex executive functions: Genetic and environmental influences with clinical and educational implications. Invited talk. University of Washington, Seattle.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 5, 2009). Interrelations between creativity and executive functions: Lessons from Psychology and Neuroscience for cultivating giftedness in young people. Invited talk in a speaker series at Evergreen, hosted by the Evergreen School and the UW Psychology Dept., University of Washington, Seattle.
view online: www.evergreenschool.org/ftpimages/551/download/Diamond%20Presentation.pdf

Diamond, A. (Nov. 4, 2009). Genetic and environmental influences on prefrontal cortex executive functions: Practical relevance and clinical implications. Invited talk. Child Psychiatry Rounds, Glenrose Hospital, Edmonton, AB. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 3, 2009). ADD (ADHD without hyperactivity) is a neurobiologically and behaviorally distinct disorder from ADHD (that includes hyperactivity). Invited talk. Glenrose Hospital, Edmonton, AB. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 20, 2009). Insuring that all children and youth have the opportunities and resources to achieve their full potential and to participate in creating a better society. Keynote. Honoring Our Advocacy Fundraiser for First Call: BC Child and Youth Advocacy Coalition, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 6, 2009). Strategies and programs to improve cognitive control and academic achievement in young children: What's joy got to do with it? Invited talk. Positive Psychology Centre, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA.

Diamond, A. (October 2, 2009). Prefrontal cortex executive functions: Genetic and environmental influences with clinical and educational implications. Invited talk. Neuroscience and Cognitive Sciences Colloquium. University of Maryland at College Park. College Park, Maryland.

Diamond, A. ( September 24, 2009). Normal and atypical development of the cognitive control processes dependent on the frontal lobe. Invited talk. European Science Foundation Research Conference, St Feliu de Guixols, Catalonia, Spain. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (September 15, 2009). Cognitive neuroscience relevant to acting early in children’s lives to promote mental health and prevent mental illness. Invited talk. A Symposium on the Mental Health Promotion Considerations for the Pan-Canadian Healthy Living Strategy for PHAC. Ottawa.

Diamond, A. (September 10, 2009). Cognitive control and self-regulation in young children: Ways to improve it and why. Keynote. British Psychological Society Annual Meeting, Developmental Section, Nottingham, UK. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (September 6, 2009). Cognitive neuroscience and the importance of the arts for educating children's minds, hearts, and bodies. Invited talk. Cortona Week 2009 – an interdisciplinary conference of artists and scientists. Cortona, Tuscany, Italy.

Diamond, A. (August 7, 2009). Strategies and programs that help to improve executive functions in young children. Invited talk for a special session (Div. 7). American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Toronto. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (August 6, 2009). Prefrontal cortex and developmental neuropsychology: Practical relevance of what we know about genetic and environmental influences on prefrontal cortex. Invited talk for a special session (Div. 40). American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Toronto. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (July 19-24, 2009). Prefrontal cortex executive functions: Genetic and environmental influences and clinical implications. A week-long invited course at the Center for Cognitive Science, New Bulgarian University, Sofia, Bulgaria.
view online: www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXgToTwPhNU%20

Diamond, A. (July 13, 2009). Developmental change in, and environmental modulation of, cognitive control: Differences by gender and genetics. Invited talk. UC Berkeley Conference on Neurocognitive Development, University of California - Berkeley.

Diamond, A. (June 10, 2009). Prefrontal cortex and developmental neuropsychology: Genetic and environmental influences. Invited academic talk, M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California - Davis.
view online: media.mindinstitute.org/video/dls/2009/mov/diamond_2009_dls_01.mov

Diamond, A. (June 10, 2009). Cognitive control in young children and ways to improve it. Invited community talk, M.I.N.D. Institute, University of California - Davis.
view online: media.mindinstitute.org/video/dls/2009/mov/diamond_2009_dls_02.mov

Evans, J.W., Fossella, J., Hampson, E., Kirschbaum, C., & Diamond, A. (May 25, 2009). Gender differences in the cognitive functions sensitive to the level of dopamine in prefrontal cortex. Poster presented at the Association for Psychological Science annual meeting, San Francisco, CA.

Diamond, A. (May 8, 2009). Practical relevance of what we know about genetic and environmental influences on prefrontal cortex. Keynote. Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI) Annual Conference, Sydney, Australia. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (May 7, 2009). Strategies and programs to help improve executive functions in young children. Invited half-day workshop, Australian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI) Annual Conference, Sydney, Australia. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 7, 2009). Development of the refinement of attention, and some ways to aid its development. Invited talk. “Mind and Life” Meeting on Attention and Memory, a five-day meeting with the Dalai Lama at his residence in Dharamsala, India.

Munro, S., & Diamond, A. (Apr. 3, 2009). Developing executive function skills for school success in preschoolers. Presented in the symposium: “Promoting Executive Functions in Young Children: The Role of Family and Child Characteristics and Early Education,” Society for Research in Child Development Biennial Meeting, Denver, CO.

Munro, S., & Diamond, A. (Apr. 2, 2009). Outcome of a Vygotskian approach to improving executive functions in preschoolers. Presented in the symposium: “Mediating Mechanisms: Building Knowledge of Young Children's Social-Emotional Development from Three Preschool Efficacy Trials,” Society for Research in Child Development, Denver, CO.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 30, 2009). Invited short talk, Board of Directors’ Reception, Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI). Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A (March 25, 2009). Activities to improve executive functions in young children. Invited presentation, Lake Washington Literacy Council, Edmonds, WA. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A (March 25, 2009). Parents, play, and the brain. Invited keynote address at the Annual Spring In-Service for Parent Educators, Organization of Parent Education Programs, Lake Washington Technical College Parent Education Program, Lake Washington, WA. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 18, 2009). Frontal lobe and executive function. Invited lecture in Neuroscience Graduate Course (501) in Module 4: Disorders of Cognition, Communication & Emotion, UBC.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 19, 2009). Practical relevance of what we know about genetic and environmental influences on prefrontal cortex: Interventions to help improve executive functions in children. Invited talk. 2009 Developmental Neurogenomic Seminar Series, Centre for Community Child Health Research, Children's & Women's Health Centre of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 17, 2009). The anatomy, development ,genetic influences on, and cognitive abilities that depend upon prefrontal cortex. Part of a series of four invited talks for Area Counsellors, Speech and Language Pathologists, and Psychologists with the Vancouver School Board, Vancouver, BC. Pro D / CE credits provided for each talk.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 17, 2009). Interventions to improve executive functions in young children. Part of a series of four invited talks for Area Counsellors, Speech and Language Pathologists, and Psychologists with the Vancouver School Board, Vancouver, BC. Pro D / CE credits provided for each talk.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 17, 2009). Early cognitive development, especially the development of executive functions. Part of a series of four invited talks for Area Counsellors, Speech and Language Pathologists, and Psychologists with the Vancouver School Board, Vancouver, BC. Pro D / CE credits provided for each talk.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 17, 2009). Neurocognitive tests used to assess executive functions in young children. Part of a series of four invited talks for Area Counsellors, Speech and Language Pathologists, and Psychologists with the Vancouver School Board, Vancouver, BC. Pro D / CE credits provided for each talk.

Diamond, A. (Feb. 12, 2009). Genetic and environmental influences on cognitive abilities dependent on prefrontal cortex: Practical relevance of what we know. The Helen H. Molinari Memorial Lecture in Neuroscience, Center for Neuropharmacology & Neuroscience, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY.

Diamond, A. (Jan 15, 2009). What are the tasks we claim are measuring working memory, inhibition, and switching really measuring? Invited talk. “What is the Organization of Prefrontal Cortex for Executive Function?," inaugural conference of a series on "Executive Function & Dysfunction," University of Boulder, CO.

Evans, J.W., Fossella, J., Hampson, E., Kirschbaum, C., & Diamond, A. (Jan. 15, 2009). Gender differences in the cognitive functions sensitive to the level of dopamine in prefrontal cortex. Poster presented at “What is the Organization of Prefrontal Cortex for Executive Function?," inaugural conference of a series on "Executive Function & Dysfunction," University of Boulder, CO.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 9, 2009). Prefrontal cortex: Expanding the boundaries of our knowledge and using what we know to prevent disorders and help children. John P. Zubek Memorial Lecture, Dept. of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 20, 2008), Genetic and environmental influences on Prefrontal Cortex: Relevance of what we know to what can be done to help children. Invited talk presented at Schneider Children's Medical Center, Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 17, 2008). Relevance of what we know about genetic and environmental influences on Prefrontal Cortex to what can be done to help children. Invited talk presented at Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 13, 2008). Genetic and Environmental influences on cognitive abilities dependent on Prefrontal Cortex: Practical relevance of what we know. Invited talk presented at Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 4, 2008). Prefrontal Cortex and developmental neuropsychiatry. Invited talk presented at BC Children's Hospital Neuropsychiatry Rounds. Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct 20, 2008). Neuroscience and education: Direct relevance of scientific discoveries to educational practice. Invited public address in day-long celebration of the 20th Anniversary of the journal, Neuron. A free public symposium, “The Impact of Neuroscience on Society,” organized by Cell Press, Fondation Ipsen, and Massachusetts General Hospital, held at the Collège de France, Paris.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 10, 2008). Improving executive functions in young children, and, gender differences in the PFC dopamine system in adults. Invited presentation to BC Neuropsychiatry Grand Rounds, at UBC Hospital and linked via video teleconference province-wide to 24 remote sites. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Sept 5, 2008). Genetic and environmental influences on the expression of cognitive abilities dependent on prefrontal cortex: Relevance of what we know to what can be done to help children. RO Jones Memorial Speaker at the Canadian Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Conference Co-Organizer, 2nd Biennial Conference. Brain development and learning: Making sense of the science, Vancouver, BC, July 12-15, 2008

Diamond, A. (July 15, 2008). Cognitive control in young children and ways to improve it. Talk presented at the “Brain Development and Learning” Making Sense of the Science” biennial conference, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (July 6, 2008). Prefrontal cortex and developmental neuropsychology. Special talk presented to the Servicio de Clínicas Interdisciplinarias at the Hospital Nacional de Pediatría, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (July 4, 2008). Cognitive control in young children: Ways to measure it and to improve it. Invited Birch Lecture at the International Neuropsychological Society Annual Meeting, Buenos Aries, Argentina.

Diamond, A. (July 3, 2008). Prefrontal cortex dysfunction in developmental neuropsychological disorders: Relevance of what we know to what can be done to help the children. An invited 3-hour Workshop at the International Neuropsychological Society Annual Meeting, Buenos Aries, Argentina. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (June 24, 2008). Cognitive control (executive functions) in young children: Relevance of what we know to what can be done to help children. Invited Address in Plenary Session: “Emotion-Regulation and the Central Nervous System: How Children’s Brains Connect with Their Learning” at the Head Start National Research Conference, Washington, DC.

Diamond, A. (June 19, 2008). Prefrontal cortex: Expanding the boundaries of our knowledge and using what we already know to prevent disorders and help children. Invited talk. UBC Dept. of Psychiatry Research Day, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education Credits provided.

Diamond, A. (June 19, 2008). Commencement Address. Eaton Arrowsmith School, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (June 5, 2008). Improving children’s lives, discipline, and cognitive skills through dance. Invited talk at National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) meeting on “Can Physical Activity and Exercise Prevent Drug Abuse? Promoting a Full Range of Science to Inform Prevention” in Bethesda, MD.

Diamond, A. (May 29, 2008). The Neuroscience and cognitive science of executive functions: Where the translational and implementation opportunities lay. Invited presentation at the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Washington, DC

Organizer and Chair of a Symposium on understanding Executive Functions: Integrating biological, developmental, and educational perspectives for the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Society, Chicago, IL, May 25 2008

Diamond, A. (May 26, 2008). For disorders such as PTSD & ADHD: Relevance of what we know to what can be done to help children. Invited 3-hour workshop for the Vancouver Coastal Foster Care Support Services, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education Credits provided.

Diamond, A. (May 25, 2008). Executive function skills can be improved in low-income preschoolers at minimal expense: Implications for reducing ADHD incidence and achievement gap between richer and poorer children. In a Symposium on “Understanding Executive Functions: Integrating Biological, Developmental, and Educational Perspectives” (chair: Adele Diamond), Association for Psychological Science Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.

Diamond, A. (May 15, 2008). Genetic and environmental influences on the expression of cognitive abilities dependent on prefrontal cortex. Invited Lecture, Canadian Centre for Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Lethbridge, AB.

Diamond, A. (May 7, 2008). For disorders such as PTSD, ADHD, & autism: Relevance of what we know to what can be done to help children. Invited 3-hour workshop, Ministry of Children and Family Development, Abbotsford, BC. Continuing Education Credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 14, 2008). Differential difficulty of inhibitory control and memory load at different periods of life. In a Symposium on “The rise and fall of cognitive control: Lifespan development,” Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 7, 2008). Invited to be member of the ‘distinguished panel’ at a public dialogue on “A New Vision of Learning: Balancing Educating the Mind with Educating the Heart,” Wosk Centre for Dialogue, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 6, 2008). Invited presentation, Conference on Developmental Issues in Contemplative Education, Garrison Institute, Garrison, NY.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 31, 2008). Genetic and environmental influences on the expression of cognitive abilities dependent on prefrontal cortex. Neuroscience colloquium, University of Western Ontario, London, ON.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 19, 2008). Genetic and environmental influences on the expression of cognitive abilities dependent on prefrontal cortex. Invited 2-hour lecture, Neuroscience graduate course, Module 4: Disorders of Cognition, UBC Faculty of Medicine, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 15, 2008). Helping children become masters of their own behavior: Novel methods for improving cognitive control (executive functions) in young children and their relevance for disorders such as ADHD. APS William James Distinguished Lecture at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston, MA. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 18, 2008). Prefrontal cortex dysfunction and developmental disorders: Relevance of what we know to what can be done to help children. Cognitive Science colloquium, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 17, 2008). Cognitive control (executive functions) in young children: Some things we’ve learned about it and about how to improve it. Invited talk, College of Education, early childhood administrators & teachers, United Way personnel, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 9, 2007).  The development, neural basis, & techniques for assessment of self-regulation (executive functions): What early childhood educators should know. Talk presented at National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.

Diamond, A.  (Oct. 12, 2007). Prefrontal executive functions: Genetic and environmental influences and clinical implications. Invited Address to the Inaugural Joint Meeting of the BC Pediatric and Neonatal Societies, Burnaby, BC.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 3, 2007).  Three lessons from neuroscience relevant to education.  Keynote Address, Symposium on “Brains, learning and educational innovation,” Maastricht University.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 3, 2007).  The future of learning: A neuroscience perspective.  Opening of the Academic Year Address, University of Maastricht, Netherlands.
view online: www.youtube.com/watch?v=uU3RCUWmmHU

Diamond, A. (July 2, 2007). Novel methods for improving and assessing executive functions in young children. Presented in invited symposium, “Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience of the Executive Functions dependent on the Frontal Lobe:  Challenging Long-held Beliefs” at the International Neuropsychological Society Annual Meeting, Bilbao, Spain. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (June 6, 2007). Some things I’ve learned in 25 years: some generalizations concerning cognition and cognitive development. Colloquium, Dept. of Psychology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

Diamond, A. & Wu, Y. (June 1, 2007). Development of a social ‘Simon’ effect. Talk presented in a symposium entitled, “Perception and Action in Social and non-Social Domains in Children and Adults: Re-thinking Theory of Mind, Stimulus-Response Compatibility, and Intentionality,” Jean Piaget Society Annual Meeting, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Diamond, A. (May 29, 2007). Some lessons from cognitive development for cognitive neuroscience, and some lessons from cognitive neuroscience for cognitive development, Leiden University, Netherlands.

Diamond, A. (May 24, 2007). Innovative practices: Supporting teachers as well as supporting students; addressing students’ physical, artistic, and emotional needs as well as their cognitive ones; and some targeted ways to assess outcomes. Closing Keynote Address, HELP Workshop on Innovative Assessment Practices – Supporting Families and Community, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (May 8, 2007). Teaching cognitive control & emotional self-regulation to preschoolers and assessing their benefits. Presented in a Symposium on “Implications of Cognitive Neuroscience for Education,” Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, New York, NY.
Diamond, A. (Apr. 25, 2007). Brain research. Invited talk, Student Support Services for the West Vancouver public schools (school psychologists, speech and language pathologists, and learning support teachers), West Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A., Leong, D., & Bodrova, E. (Mar. 31, 2007). Helping children become masters of their own behavior: A preschool curriculum that improves executive functions. Presented in a Symposium entitled, “Promoting the Development of Self-Regulation in Young Children Through Innovative Curricula and Teacher Interactions,” Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Boston, MA.

Feng, X., Bialystok, E., & Diamond A. (Mar. 31, 2007). Manipulating information in working memory - an advantage for bilinguals. Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, March, Boston, MA.

Diamond, A. (Jan. 11, 2007). Brain research. An invited workshop for Principals and Vice Principals, Secondary Education and Instructional Services, West Vancouver School District #45, West Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Organizer & Chair of Invited Symposium, Developmental cognitive neuroscience of the executive functions dependent on the frontal lobe: Challenging long-held beliefs, International Neuropsychological Society, 2007

Organizer & Chair of Symposium, Perception and action in social and non-social domains in children and adults, Jean Piaget Society Annual Meeting, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 2007

Co-Organizer of Symposium, Implications of cognitive neuroscience for education, Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, 2007

Diamond, A. (Nov. 3, 2006). Genes that affect dopamine (COMT, DAT1, and DRD4): Gender differences and disorder differences. Invited TGIF talk, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics, BC Children and Women’s Health Centre, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Nov. 1, 2006). How children think. Invited presentation, Mini-Med School Series of the Child and Family Research Institute, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 31, 2006). Developmental cognitive neuroscience. Invited presentation, 4th year Biomedical students at UBC, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 20, 2006). Prefrontal cortex and neurodevelopmental disorders. Grand Rounds, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, for physicians, pediatric residents, and allied health care professionals, Calgary, AB, Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 20, 2006). Genetic and environmental influences on the expression of cognitive abilities dependent on prefrontal cortex. Medical Genetics Grand Rounds, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 22, 2006). Close interrelations of the development, and neural bases, of motor and cognitive functions. Neuroscience Grand Rounds, Hotckiss Brain Institute, Calgary, AB, Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Aug. 20, 2006). (ADHD without Hyperactivity) is a neurobiologically & behaviorally distinct disorder from ADHD (with Hyperactivity). Presentation, Brain Development and Learning” Making Sense of the Science Conference, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Conference Co-Organizer, 1st Biennial Conference. Brain development and learning: Making sense of the science, Vancouver, BC, August 19-22, 2006

Diamond, A. (May 24, 2007). Innovative practices: Supporting teachers as well as supporting students; addressing students’ physical, artistic, and emotional needs as well as their cognitive ones; and some targeted ways to assess outcomes. Closing Keynote Address at HELP Workshop on Innovative Assessment Practices – Supporting Families and Community, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (June 27, 2006). Executive functions and prefrontal cortex. Invited talk. Unilever 'Child Mental Development' Workshop, Rotterdam, NE.

Diamond, A. (June 23, 2006). Motor development and cognitive development during infancy. Invited talk, Laboratory of Alain Berthoz, Collège de France, Paris, France.

Diamond, A. (June 16, 2006). Development of inhibitory control, mental manipulation, and cognitive flexibility. Invited talk, Neurofunctional Imagery Group (GIN), Ciceron Brain and Cognition Center, Caen, France. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. & Seamans, J. (June 9, 2006). Clinical implications of recent work on prefrontal cortex function. Invited workshop at the Annual UBC Dept. of Psychiatry Clinical Day, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (May 19, 2006). Preschool training in self-regulation: Helping children help themselves. Invited talk for Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP) Research Day, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. & Leong, D. (May 11, 2006). Teaching cognitive and emotional self-tegulation to preschoolers and assessing its benefits. Invited Workshop presented at the Supporting Children’s Social and Emotional Health: Assessment Tools, Research and Practice Conference, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (May 4, 2006). The prefrontal dopamine system and the periarcuate relational system. Invited talk at conference on “Prefrontal Cortex, Working Memory, Flexible Behavior: In memoriam for Patricia S Goldman-Rakic.” Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT.

Diamond, A. (May 3, 2006). Some things I've learned in 25 years: Some generalizations concerning cognition and cognitive development. Presentation, Current Work in Developmental Psychology series, Yale University, New Haven, CT.

Diamond, A. (May 2, 2006). Invited talk, Sackler Institute, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, New York City, NY.

Diamond, A. (April 28, 2006). Developmental change in, and environmental modulation of, cognitive control: Differences by gender and genetics. Invited talk presented at the “Executive and Prefrontal Functions: Exploring Supervision and Volition” in the Brain Workshop at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, UBC, Vancouver, BC

Diamond, A. (April 19, 2006). What are the principal unanswered research questions concerning executive function and executive control of attention? Can these abilities be improved in children as young as 3-5 years and if so what are the benefits of doing do so? Invited talk at Garrison Institute’s Program on Contemplation and Education: Workshop on the role of attentional abilities in the social-emotional development of young children, Garrison, NY.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 10, 2006). The development and neural bases of cognitive flexibility and executive function. Invited Presentation, American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA.

Munro, S., Chau, C., Gazarian, K. & Diamond, A. (Apr. 9, 2006). Dramatically larger Flanker effects (6-fold elevation). Presentation, Cognitive Neuroscience Society Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA. Cognitive Neuroscience Society 2006 Annual Meeting, 164.

Diamond, A. (Mar. 31, 2006). Invited presentation at a workshop organized on behalf of the Jacobs Foundation called "Research Frontiers for Intervention and Assessment,” Marbach Castle, Lake Constance, Germany.

Diamond, A, (Feb. 14, 2006). Genetic and environmental influences on the expression of cognitive abilities dependent on prefrontal cortex. Invited Presentation at Gordon Conference on Genes and Behavior. Ventura, CA. Continuing Education credit provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 28, 2005). Autism and grasping conceptual connections among physically connected and unconnected items. Grand Rounds at Queen Alexandria Centre for Children’s Health, Victoria, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (Oct. 27, 2005). Some generalizations concerning cognition and cognitive development. Colloquium to the Department of Psychology, University of Victoria, BC.

Feng, X., Diamond, A., & Bialystok, E. (Oct. 22, 2005). Executive functions in monolingual and bilingual children: separating working memory and inhibitory control. Presentation, The Biennial Meeting of the Cognitive Development Society, San Diego, CA.

Diamond, A. (Sept. 9, 2005). Prefrontal cortex and neurodevelopmental disorders. Dr. Hira Panikkar Memorial Lecture, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (June 1, 2005). Autism and grasping connections between items physically unconnected. Division of Developmental Pediatrics. Education/Research Rounds at Sunny Hill Centre, Vancouver, BC. Continuing Education credits provided.

Diamond, A. (May 6, 2005). Frontal lobe dysfunction in young children and environmental interventions that improve children’s frontal lobe functioning. Henry Dunn Lecture at the commencement of the Northwest Pacific Pediatric Neurology Society Annual Meeting, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Apr. 27-29, 2005). Cognitive flexibility: Its development and its modulation by genes and environment. Invited Presentation at Conference on Advances in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience. Amsterdam, Netherlands.
view online: users.fmg.uva.nl/mhuizinga/workshop.htm

Diamond, A. (Apr. 20, 2005). ADD (ADHD without hyperactivity), a neurobiologically and behaviorally distinct disorder from ADHD (with hyperactivity). Invited presentation, Mini-Med School Series at BC Research Institute for Children’s & Women’s Health, Vancouver, BC.
view online:
http://www.bcricwh-training.bc.ca/speakers_events/minimed_school/mini_med_school.htm

Diamond, A. (Apr. 3-4, 2005). Neurochemistry and early childhood education:  Genetic and environmental influences on the development of executive function. Invited presentation at Emory Cognition Project Conference on Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Conference, Atlanta, Georgia.

Diamond, A. (March 19-20, 2005). Interrelations between motor development and cognitive development, between “Motor” and “Cognitive” brain regions, and between “Motor” and “Cognitive” disorders. Invited address at the 17th European Conference on Neuro-Developmental Delay, Edinburgh, Scotland.

Diamond, A. (Mar., 2005). Interrelations between cognition, perception, and action, similarities between young and old, and effects of neurochemistry & early childhood education. Psychology Department Colloquium, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.

Diamond, A. (Mar., 2005). Prefrontal cortex involvement in normal development and in developmental disorders. Psychiatry Grand Rounds, 2005 Brain Awareness Week Lecture for the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neurosciences, Department of Psychology; and the Brain-Body Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
view online:dailynews.mcmaster.ca/worthmentioning.cfm?ID=2151
view online:
www.fhs.mcmaster.ca/psychiatryneuroscience/education/psych_rounds/march_2005.htm#item4

Diamond, A. (Mar., 2005). Treated phenylketonuria: Deficits in cognition and vision, and why. Keynote address, Annual Celebration of Research, BC Research Institute for Children’s & Women’s Health, Vancouver, BC.
view online:
www.bcricwh-training.bc.ca/research%20week%20posters%202205/Peds%20research%20day%202005.doc
view online: www.apa.org/research/action/pku.aspx

Diamond, A. (Mar., 2005). Selective cognitive and neurobiological effects from a global insult to the brain. Neurosciences Proseminar Guest Lecture, UBC, Vancouver.

Diamond, A. (Mar., 2005). Selective attention, negative priming, and task switching. Colloquium to the Vision Group, Department of Psychology, UBC, Vancouver.

Diamond, A. (Feb., 2005). Prefrontal cortex and neurodevelopmental disorders. Invited address at the International Neuropsychological Society Annual Meeting, St. Louis, MO.

Diamond, A. (Feb., 2005). Diamond’s laws of cognition and cognitive development. Cognitive Systems Guest Lecture Series, UBC, Vancouver.
view online: ling75.arts.ubc.ca/cogs401/news/lectures/diamond_2-22.htm

Diamond, A. (Jan., 2005). Prefrontal cortex involvement in normal development and in developmental disorders. Invited address, York University, Toronto, ON.

Diamond, A. (Jan., 2005). Measures of frontal lobe function for children and adults. Neuropsychiatry Grand Rounds, UBC Department of Psychiatry, Vancouver, BC.

Diamond, A. (Jan., 2005). Behavioral tasks that assess prefrontal functioning in infants under one year of age. Guest Lecture, Education Course, UBC, Vancouver, BC.

Before 2005: - click here.

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Media Coverage

2014 Featured in the transcript of “The Science of Attention” episode of “On Being” with Krista Tippett [originally broadcast on National Public Radio (NPR) Oct. 24, 2010] on the website DailyGood.org (Dec. 8)
  Interviewd by Stephen Quinn on the CBC Radio One program “On the Coast”: ‘UBC neuroscientist speaks at the White House’  (Oct. 1)
  Interviewed by Sonia Williams (8 min.) "Open Forum" show on Women’s Radio Network (Sept. 19)
  Listed as #13 of the “30 Most Influential Neuroscientists Alive Today” at the Online Psychology Degree Guide website (Sept.)
  Re-broadcast – with 6 min. of new material  -  of the hour-long interview first broadcast in 2010: Learning, Doing, Being – A New Science of Education, which aired on the show, “On Being” with Krista Tippett, on National Public Radio (NPR) (Aug)
  Featured in the book, “Zero to Five: 70 Essential Parenting Tips Based on Science (and What We’ve Learned so Far)” by Tracy Cutchlow and published by Pear Press, Seattle, WA (July)
  Featured in the article, “Are You a Warrior … or a Thinker?” by Molly Triffin in Self magazine (July), pages 92 – 95.
  "Principles and strategies for improving executive function skills." Invited webinar, Annie E Casey Foundation. (June 11)
  Interview of AD, “Children’s Executive Functions and Evidence-based Activities that Improve Them: An interview with Adele Diamond, Professor, University of British Columbia, Vancouver,” by Andy Feldman in Andy Feldman’s Gov Innovator Blog (June)
  Full-length Interview of AD by Scott Jacobsen published in the In-Sight journal, Issue 4.A (April 15)
Women in Academia (April 15)
  Featured in an article by Elizabeth Foy Larsen in Parents magazine (Feb)
2013 "Neuroscience (and psychology) research and Montessori.Invited talk. AMI International Montessori Congress, Portland, OR. (Aug 2)
  Featured in the article, “Vancouverites Unite to Help a Palestinian Doctor attend Brain Development Conference,” by Peter G. Prontzos in The Georgia Straight newspaper (July 24)
  "Cultivating the mind". Invited talk. Heart-Mind 2013: Helping Children Thrive, Vancouver, BC. (May 10)
  Featured in the article “10 Activities to Help your Baby's Brain Development” by Denise Davy in ParentsCanada magazine April 19)
  Featured in the article, “Why can Some Kids Handle Pressure while Others Fall Apart?” by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman in The New York Times Sunday Magazine article (Feb. 6)
This article was highlighted on the Association for Psychological Science (APS) website front page (Feb. 25)
  Featured in article, “Pass the Marshmallow Test? Your Brain's More Efficient: Study” by Wendy Leung in The Globe and Mail newspaper (Jan 22)
  Featured in the online article "Teaching Children to Train their Minds" on the LearnNow.org site (Jan)
2012 Interviewed - “Iowa Blue Zones and Adele Diamond” - by Ben Kieffer on Iowa Public Radio (Nov. 30)
  Two 2-minute interviews on "What Makes Kids Happy?" on The Morning News with Philip Till on CKNW Radio, Vancouver, BC. (Nov. 22)
  Highlighted on Iowa State University website: Neuroscientist will link Exercise to Academic and Career Success in ISU talk Nov. 29 (Nov. 19)
  Featured in the article “To Soothe Distracted Students, BC Schools Try 'Self-regulation'” by Katie Hyslop in The Tyee online newspaper (Oct. 25)
  Understanding executive functions.” Invited talk. 5th Annual Family Information Session on Executive Function: Development and Facilitation in Children with a Focus on Deaf/Hard of Hearing, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle, Washington. (Oct 13)
  Interviewed by Globo News television (Brazil) (Sept. 07)
  Featured in the Estado de São Paulo - a Brazilian newspaper - article “Ensinar é muito mais que passar conteúdo”, (Sept. 03).
  Featured in the article “Mind Games: 5 Brain-boosting Activities for Toddlers” by Ann Douglas in Canadian Family magazine (Sept. )
  Featured in the online article “Executive Function Skills Predict Children's Success in Life and in School” by Ellen Galinsky in The Blog (Huffington Post) newspaper (June)
  Child Development and the Brain: Insights to Help Every Child Thrive” Invited talk to the Garrison Institute Board of Trustees Luncheon, New York, NY. on Youtube
  Interviewed by Ingrid Wickelgren, editor, Scientific American Mind, who arranged her trip to Vancouver to accommodate when I’d be able to meet with her (Feb 28)
  Article in the Danish weekly broadsheet Weekendavisen (The Weekend Newspaper), "Nej, jeg må ej!" (No, I mustn't) by Lone Frank (Feb 17)
  TV interview which aired live - Adele Diamond on Studio 4 with Fanny Kiefer Part 1 of 2 and Adele Diamond on Studio 4 with Fanny Kiefer Part 2 of 2 - by Fanny Kiefer on the Shaw TV program Studio 4 (Jan 24)
  Interviewed for The Globe and Mail by Anne McIlroy (Jan 23)
2011 Featured in a DVD (Emotional Safety) by KidCareCanada, available both from KidCare and from the BC Ministry of Children and Family Development (Nov 23)
  Featured in the Cognitive Neuroscience of Learning: Implications for Education eBriefing and posted on the New York Academy of Sciences website by Kathleen McGowan (Dec)
  Article in The Star (Malaysia), "She's a Diamond" by Daphne Ling (Dec)
  Featured interview in the New York Academy of Sciences podcast What Your Brain Can Tell You About Learning (Nov 21)
  Why Disciplining the Mind, Reducing Stress & Loneliness, & Increasing Joy may be Critical for Children's Academic Success.” Invited address, Education Symposium, Garrison Institute, Garrison, NY. (Nov. 5)
  Article in AMI (International Montessori Association) e-Bulletin, p.19 - “Adele Diamond publishes on Executive Skills in Science Magazine” - “In the mood for Montessori reading?” section (Oct.)
  Article on our work in The Children's Mental Health Research Quarterly magazine, “Making Kindergarten more Engaging” by Daphne Gray-Grant (Oct 2011), pages 9-10
  Article in The Wall Street Journal, "Learning how to Focus on Focus; In an Age of Information Overload, simply paying Attention is the Hardest Thing" by Jonah Lehrer (Sept 3)
  Interviewed for Radio Canada science program Les années lumière by Chantal Srivastava (Aug 31)
 

In a set of six 90-second videos on the website AboutKidsHealth: trusted answers from The Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto) (Aug 4)

  Article on the website AboutKidsHealth: "Improving a Child's most Basic Skills"
  Half-hour interview on WebTalkRadio.net podcast with Karen Quinn: 30 Minute Mom – How to Raise a Child With Self-Control, Discipline, and Focus! (July 7, re-broadcast Nov 26)
  Featured in a video on the KidCareCanada website: “Introductory Emotional Safety video developed for Health Literacy Webinar : The Key to Trust, Learning and Life-long Relationship-building” (July 8)
  Live half-hour radio interview with Tommy Schnurmacher on CJAD radio's, "Tommy Schnurmacher Show" in Toronto with phone-in audience questions (Apr 11)
  Half-hour interview, “Adele Diamond at the Garrison Institute (Oct. 2008),” on her work and insights into topics such as academic outcomes for young children, stress effects on the brain and how contemplative practices might affect executive functions and cognitive control (Jan 10)
  Article in Swarthmore College Bulletin: The Magazine of Swarthmore College, “The Dances of Adele Diamond” by Robert Strauss (Jan 2011, pp. 28-32)
“ 'This is the beauty of Adele,' says Thomas Schilling, professor of psychological science at Fitchburg State University in Massachusetts and a longtime colleague of Diamond. 'She does great basic research, but has the companion career of applying it. She has done things in biology and chemistry, like her research into the dietary disorder phenylketonuria [PKU – a genetic disorder that blocks the metabolism of a certain amino acid and, if untreated, produces widespread brain damage] but then has come up with solutions, such as modifying diets. It is her work in education, though, that will be landmark. If there were a Nobel Prize for psychologists, she would be the first I would propose to win it.' ”
  Featured in the headline section - for the Times article "Playing games makes your child clever" - of the UBC Annual Review 2009-2010
2010 Front page article in Sikkim Express (India), “Paper on Brain Plasticity and Mental Transformation Presented on Day 3” by staff reporter (Dec 23)
  Hour-long radio interview: “Learning, Doing, Being— A New Science of Education” on the show,“On Being” with Krista Tippett on National Public Radio (NPR) (Oct. 24) This was a re-broadcoast of an interview on the show, “Speaking of Faith” that aired the year earlier. This re-airing of the NPR interview resulted in a 14-fold increase in visits to our lab website. We have never had so many people visit our website in one day as people did on Sunday, Oct 24
  Interviewed for the Early Childhood Innovation Project, an initiative by the Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University in partnership with the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) and the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices. (Oct 12)
  Article in InnovationCanada.ca, the online magazine of the Canada Foundation for Innovation, “Tools of the Mind” by Laura Eggertson (Sep 29)
  Quoted in article in the American Psychological Association Monitor, “The Recession's Toll on Children” by Amy Novotney (Sep 1)
  Interviewed for Canadian Family magazine by Yuki Hayashi
  Interviewed for Parents magazine by Barbara Brandon-Croft
  Article in the Vancouver Sun on Prof. Diamond’s conference, “Good Mothering Passes Benefits Across Generations, Study Reveals” by Randy Shore (July 14)
  Article in Today’s Parent magazine, “10 Surprising Brain Builders for Preschoolers” by John Hoffman (August)
  Article in The Times (UK), “Playing Games makes your Child Clever” by Helen Rumbelow (May 11)
2009 Featured in the CTV Documentary, “4 Paths to Peace,” (Dec 31, 2009)
  Hour-long radio interview: “Learning, Doing, Being— A New Science of Education” on the Peabody-award-winning show “On Being” (formerly “Speaking of Faith”) with Krista Tippett on National Public Radio (NPR) (Nov. 19, 2009; re-aired Oct 24, 2010)

Devoted a website for this, & created a blog.

Krista Tippett wrote afterwards, "The response we received to the show with you was really extraordinary and is still coming in. You are working on a frontier that is close to people’s lives and hearts.” and she posted online, “My thinking about the education I received, about school testing, and about what I want for my children will never be the same after the conversation I had with neuroscientist Adele Diamond."

  One of three scientists invited to speak on stage with the Dalai Lama and another Nobel Peace Laureate, Mairead Maguire, on “Heart-Mind Education: Enhancing Academic, Social, and Emotional Competence” at the Orpheum Theatre, Vancouver; broadcast live worldwide by CTV as part of the Vancouver Peace Summit, can be viewed on Youtube (Sept. 29)
  Featured in the short film, “Focus and Self Control” by New Screen Concepts, Inc. (with Ellen Galinsky) previewed during Ellen Galinsky’s keynote address at Harvard Graduate School of Education (Jan.), and aired for the Obama transition team on Early Learning, at their request. see Youtube video.
  Article in the Vancouver Sun newspaper, "Scientists Work to Rewire the Brain," by Randy Shore (Dec 28, 2009)
  Article in the Washington Post, “The Playtime’s the Thing,” by Emma Brown (Nov 21, 2009)
  Article in the Globe and Mail newspaper, "Look to Quebec on Early Childhood Education, expert urges," by Rhéal Séguin (Nov 16, 2009)
  Article in the Globe and Mail newspaper, "The link between Exercise and more Brainpower," by Anne McIlroy (Nov 6, 2009)
  Featured in a short promotional video for the Central and East European Center for Cognitive Science at New Bulgarian University (Sept 9)
  Article in the New York Times newspaper, "Can the Right Kinds of Play Teach Self-Control?" by Paul Tough (Sept 25, 2009)
2008 Interview for CBC documentary,"Fixing My Brain" (Nov 18 & Dec 30)
  Radio interview for the show “Morning Edition” on National Public Radio (NPR) (Feb. 28)
NPR also set up a Q&A where listeners emailed in questions and Prof. Diamond’s answers were posted were posted online
  TV interview on the show, “Leisure Talk,” on Fairchild TV (Jan. 14)
  TV interview on CTV on the show “Your Health with Dr. Rhonda Low” (Jan. 7)
  Article in the The Economic Times: India Times newspaper, “Researchers now Train Young Brains to Behave” (Sept. 16)
  Article in the New York Times, “Training Young Brains to Behave,” by Benedict Carey (Sept. 15)
  Newsweek Web Exclusive Article by Wray Herbert, “Is EF the new IQ?” (June 10)
This was the most e-mailed story on Newsweek.com the week it appeared
  Article in the Sacramento Bee newspaper, “Teaching self-control can be child’s play, research shows,” by Jeremy Manier (April 6)
  Article in the Chicago Tribune newspaper, “Self-control? It’s child’s play,” by Jeremy Manier (March 25)
  Simultaneous webcast of 10-minute talk by AD as part of the “Brains R’ Us” Scientific Program at the Salk Institute, La Jolla, CA (March 3). That 10-minute talk by AD was broadcast on the Science Network (as part of a special program entitled “Brains R Us” (March 3)
2007 Radio interview on the BBC, Science: Leading Edge program, December 6
  Article in the UK’s Daily Telegraph newspaper, "'Formal play' better prepares Children for School" by Roger Highfield (Nov. 29)
  Article in FirstScience.com, an online news magazine (Nov. 29)
  Article in the Vancouver Sun newspaper, "Extra Playtime shown to Help Preschoolers Focus" by Chadd Shelton; (Nov. 30)
  Article in United Press International, "Preschool Curriculum helps Performance" (Nov. 30)
  Article in Science Daily, "Pre-School Program Shown To Improve Key Cognitive Functions, Self-Control" (Nov. 30)
  Article in Earthtimes.org, "Preschool Curriculum helps Performance " (Nov 30)
  Article in NIH Research Matters, "an eColumn for a General Audience highlighting NIH research" (Dec. 10)
2006 Photo and brief synopsis of our research in the Vancouver Sun’s announcement of the finalists for the YWCA’s Women of Distinction award (April)
  Article about me and our research findings in the Swarthmore College Bulletin (March)
2005 Article in the Dutch newspaper, NRC Handelsblad, on our work (July 3)
2004 Speaker at Press Conference with Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin, UBC Pres. Martha Piper, and others to announce new CRC Professors (Nov. 12)
2003 Feature article on Prof. Diamond & her work in the ARCLight magazine
2002 Article in The Independent (a British newspaper) by Sanjida O'Connell (April 22)
  Live interview, " Nine to Noon" show, New Zealand National Radio, about our research and its implications for ADHD (June 19)
  Segment in Public Television series, Scientific Am. Frontiers Series w/ Alan Alda on PBS, devoted to our research (Oct. 15)
  Feature-length web article on our research by Jacqueline Mitchell of Scientific American
  Frontiers on the PBS website in connection with the TV program
  Newspaper story on front page of Health & Sci. section, Boston Globe by Judy Foreman, discussing our proposed research on effect of early bilingualism on brain dev. (Sept. 10)
1999 Featured Guest, along with Jack Shonkoff, on the Public Radio (NPR) show, The Connection
Featured in two popular Trade Books
  NurtureShock: New Thinking about Children by Po Bronson & Ashley Merryman (published in 2009) - a New York Times #1 Bestseller, featured on Good Morning America, Nightline, All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and in Newsweek
  Mind in the Making: The Seven Essential Life Skills Every Child Needs by Ellen Galinsky (published in 2010) - featured on the CBS Evening News with Katie Couric

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Service

Service to the University

Organizer

Organizer, yearly Colloquium Series for the Institute of Mental Health (2006-2009)

Co-Organizer, Mental Health and Neurobiology Cluster, Child & Family Research Institute, Get-Acquainted Day (2006)

Co-Organizer of the Peter Wall Institute of Advanced Studies Workshop on “Executive and Prefrontal Functions: Exploring Supervision and Volition in the Brain” (2005-2006)

Other service to the University

for service as a Faculty Mentor see MENTOR category below - click here

Member, UBC Stage 2 Internal Review Committee (CIHR Foundation Scheme: 2014 1st Live Pilot Competition) (2014 – present)

Member, Departmental Advisory Committee, Psychiatry Department, UBC (2012 – present)

Chair, Student Presentations at UBC Psychiatry Department’s Annual Research Day (June 24, 2010)

Guest lecturer, Neuroscience 501 graduate course, yearly lecture (2005 – present) Guest lecturer, Faculty of Education graduate course, biennial lecture (2005 – present)

Teaching, without compensation, an undergraduate course (Psyc 205-006: The Lifespan Social, Emotional & Cognitive Development of the Person in its Social, Cultural, and Biological Context), offered every other year

Teaching, without compensation, a graduate seminar (EPSE 604), Social, Emotional and Cognitive Development in Social, Cultural and Biological Context

Teaching, without compensation, a graduate seminar (PSYT 550), Prefrontal Cortex and Executive Functions

Gave invited short seminar: Conceptual and strategic issues related to NIH success. NIH workshop for UBC faculty, The Health Research Resource Office, UBC (2009)

Invited judge at the First Vancouver Brain Bee: a competition for Vancouver high school students grades 10 – 12 (2009)

Consultant, Dean of Graduate Studies’ plans to submit a CFI application for an Institute for Transdisciplinary Research (2008)

Wrote research grant for Dr. Margaret Weiss (Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, UBC & BC Children’s) that got funded on ” Do children with ADHD, who respond well to amphetamine medication but not to methylphenidate, have allelic variants of the SNAP 25 gene?”

Internal Reviewer, CIHR operating grant application by Linda Siegel (in Education Faculty): “Long-Term Cognitive, Educational, Neuropsychological, and Behavioural Outcomes for Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated with Chemotherapy" (2007)

Internal Reviewer, applications from Psychiatry faculty for MSFHR Career

Investigator award: Mark Lau: “Using Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy to reduce ‘cognitive reactivity’ – A psychological risk factor of depressive relapse" and Jeremy Seamans: “Dopamine modulation of prefrontal cortex network dynamics” (2006)

Host of Brain Research Centre neuroscience colloquium speakers, e.g. Sheila Innis & Steve Miller,MD

Press Conference Speaker at BCRICWH together with PM Paul Martin concerning the CRC Program

Interviewer for BCRICWH, Candidates for the SFU Leadership Chair in MEG (2005)

Judge, Student Presentations at the Psychiatry Department’s Annual Research Day (2005)

Invited lectures (2004- 2005), to classes in the Education Faculty, Neuroscience Graduate Program, & Cognitive Systems Undergraduate Program, & to the Vision Program within the Psychology Dept., Grand Rounds in Neuropsychiatry, Grand Rounds at Children & Women’s in: Pediatrics, Neurology, and Psychiatry, and Mini-Med School at Children’s & Women’s

Service to the Field and to the Community

Organizer, International Biennial Conference Series “Brain Development & Learning.” This is a service to the larger community of parents, policymakers, educators, physicians, psychologists, and allied health professions (2005-present)

  • 2013 Brain Development and Learning Meeting:  braindevelopmentandlearning.com/BDL2013/
                                   Online Resources
  • 2010 Brain Development and Learning Meeting: www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/bdl.html
                                    In Utero Effects; Parent-Infant Interaction
                                    Learning & Memory; Math and Reading
                                    Respecting Cultural Differences
                                    Mental Health; Promoting Joy, Resilience, and Creativity
  • 2010 Conference Feedback: www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/BDL_subpages_2010/feedback_big_2010.html

    2010 Online Resources: www.braindevelopmentandlearning.com/Resources2010

  • 2008 Brain Development and Learning Meeting: www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/bdl2008.html
                                   Stress
                                   Prefrontal Cortex
  • 2008 Conference Feedback: www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/BDL_subpages_2008/sponsorsfeedback.html

  • 2006 Brain Development and Learning Meeting:www.interprofessional.ubc.ca/bdl2006.html
                                   Plasticity
                                   Interventions
  • Ad Hoc Reviewer for Journals - click here.

    Reviewer of grant applications - click here.

    External examiner

    • Advisor, Dissertation of Marianna Staroselsky, Ph.D. candidate, Comparative Human Development program, U. of Chicago, IL (2012)
    • External Examiner, Dissertation of Sissela Nutley Berman, Ph.D. candidate, Dept. Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stokholm, Sweden (2011)
    • External Examiner, Dissertation of Afra Foroud, Ph.D. candidate, U. of Lethbridge, AB (2008)
    • External Examiner, Dissertation of Michelle Martin, Ph.D. candidate, York U., Toronto, ON (2005)
    • External Examiner, Dissertation of Toni Jones, Ph. D. candidate, U. of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia (2004)
    • External Examiner, Dissertation of Daniela Kloo, Ph.D. candidate, U. of Salzburg, Austria (2003)
    • External Examiner. Dissertation of Stephan Huijbregts, Ph.D. candidate at Vrije U., Amsterdam, Netherlands (2002)

    Mentor

    • External admissions interviewer (2010 – present), Harvard University.
    • External admissions interviewer (2010 – present, Swarthmore College.
    • Faculty Mentor (2012 - present) to Assistant Prof. Ziba Vaghri, Food, Nutrition and Health program, & Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP).
    • Faculty Mentor (2010 - present) to Assistant Prof. Naznin Virji-Babul, Dept. of Physical Therapy, UBC.
    • Faculty Mentor (2010 - present) to Assistant Prof. Claudia Jacova, Div. of Neurology, UBC.
    • Mentor (2013) to Sneha Sheth, a master's student in MEDI 502 lab rotation.
    • Mentor (2012 – present) to Alessandra Gotuzo Seabra, PhD, Professor in Graduate Program - Developmental Disorders, Universidade Mackenzie, São Paulo, Brazil.
    • Mentor (2011 - present) to Assistant Professor Kimberley Lakes, PhD, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine: & Co-Director, Community Engagement Unit, Institute for Clinical and Translational Science; University of California, Irvine on her research on the benefits of traditional Taekwondo for executive functions and academic performance of school children.
    • Mentor (2011 - present) to Monica Tsethlikai, , PhD, Lecturer, University of Utah, Salt Lake City.
    • Mentor (2013 - present) to Sarah J. Short, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Dept of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, on her K Award ( K01 Mentored Research Scientist Development Award).
    • Mentor (2011-2012) to Laura Ricci, MA student, Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA “Perhaps you are, as you say, a professor from the University of British Columbia - but to me, you are an angel sent from the very finest research laboratory in heaven. I truly cannot thank you enough for your generous help. Enormous appreciation.”
    • Met with aspiring Developmental Science PhD students at “Lunch with the Leaders” session (2011) Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development, Montreal, QC.
    • Mentor (2011) to Sarah J. Short on her K Award ( K01) to NIMH on Comparing working memory development in children at genetic hight risk for schizophrenia and to examine the structural plasticity of associated brain regions and white matter tracts.
    • Mentor (2009-present) to Assoc. Research Scientist Clifford Saron, Center for Mind and Brain, UC-Davis.
    • Mentor (2009 - 2010) Assoc. Prof. Kimberley Schonert-Riechl, Dept. of Educational and Counselling Psychology, and Special Education (ECPS), UBC, on scientific writing.
    • Mentor (2009 - 2010) Assoc. Prof. Jeremy Seamans, Dept. of Psychiatry, UBC, on lecture styles.
    • Mentor (2007 - 2012) to Tinashe Chatora, a UBC undergraduate from Zimbabwe.
    • Mentor (2011 - 2013) to Carolyn Lye, a grade 11 student from Sentinel Secondary in West Vancouver, BC.
    • Mentor (2011 - 2013) to Deepali Prasad, a grade 11 student from Crofton House School, Vancouver, BC.
    • Mentored (2009-2010) to Mio Tomisawa, a grade 10 student at Steveston London Secondary, Richmond, BC.
    • Met with aspiring Developmental Science PhD students at “Lunch with the Leaders” session, Biennial Meeting.
      of the Society for Research in Child Development, Montreal, QC (2011).
    • Mentor (2010 - present) to Mentor to Radhika Bapat, Founder and Director, Child Guidance Centre, Sahyadri Specialty Hospital, Pune, India, mentoring her on how to administer a large array of neurocognitive measures to children across a wide age range to use by Radhika and others in her clinic to help very poor children, especially those with special needs.
    • Mentor (2009 - present) to Tamar Mendelson, PhD, Dept. of Mental Health, John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, mentoring her on what executive function measures to use and how to administer them to school children, as well as providing her with guidance in the analysis and interpretation of the results from these measures in her assessment of the feasibility and efficacy of a school-based substance-abuse prevention program involving mindfulness and yoga.
    • Mentored (2008-2010) to Research Associate Charo Rueda, Cognitive Neuroscience Research Group, Dept. of Experimental Psychology, University of Granada, Spain.
    • Mentored (2005 - 2011) to John Fossella, PhD, on his K Award ( K01 Mentored Research Scientist Development Award) for John, an accomplished molecular geneticist, to continue his training in cognitive development and functional neuroimaging.
    • Mentored (2004-2010) to Professor Eveline Crone, Developmental and Educational Psychology, Univ. Leiden, Netherlands.
    • Mentored (2004-2009) to Professor Bruce Morton, Dept. of Psychology, U. Western Ontario.
    • Mentored (2002 - 2005) to Krestin Radonovich, PhD, Div. of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, in her K-23 Research Career Award on pediatric neuroimaging and behavioral testing of very young children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Consultant - click here.

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    Training Others on our Neurocognitive Tasks

    Provide intensive 1-2 week training (free of charge) on the neurocognitive measures I developed:

    • June, 2014. One week intensive training for Spyridoula Vazou, PhD, Ass't Prof., Dept. of Kinesiology, Iowa State Univ., Ames & Patrizia Tortella, student, Ca' Foscari University of Venice, Italy.
    • May, 2004: to Eva van de Weijer-Bergsma, Ph.D. student, Utrecht University, Netherlands, for a study of the role of maternal interactive styles in preterm children’s development of attentional networks.
    • August, 2001: to Anne-Claire Beernick, Ph.D. student with Jan Buitelaar, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands, to study predictors, in infancy, of externalizing behavior disorders.
    • June, 2001: to Karen Davis, Research Assistant Linda Mayes, M.D., Department of Child Psychiatry, Yale University, for study of prefrontal cortex cognitive deficits in children who had been exposed to cocaine in utero
    • Sept., 2000: to Julien Gross, Ph.D. student with Harlene Hayne, Dept. of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, for studying delayed nonmatching to sample performance in infants.
    • Aug., 2000: to Erik Hazen, M.D./Ph.D. student with Linda Mayes, Yale Univ. School of Medicine, for study of prefrontal cortex cognitive deficits in children exposed to cocaine in utero
    • June, 2000: to Alex Hogan, Ph.D. student with Faraneh Vargha-Khadem, London University, England, for studies of pre-clinical anterior blood perfusion deficits in infancy in children who have sickle cell disease.
    • May, 1997: to Joseph & Sandra Jacobsen, Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI, for study of cognitive consequences of PCB exposure among Inuit Eskimoes in northern Quebec (2-day training)
    • Mar., 1995: to Anna Drummey, Ph.D. student with Nora Newcombe, Temple Univ., Phila., PA, to study the development of executive functions in children 3-7 years of age.
    • Mar., 1994: to Shaune Bornholdt, Children's Hospital of New Jersey, Newark, NJ for use in her work with children with treated PKU and with children exposed to lead
    • June, 1993: to Jenna Steere, Assistant to Amy Arnsten, Yale University School of Medicine, for use in research on children with ADHD
    • Sept., 1991: to Virginia Frisk and Jacqui Paige, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, for their research characterizing the developmental disabilities in infants and children who were born prematurely
    • Aug., 1991: to Sydney Reisbick and Martha Neuringer, Oregon Regional Primate Center, Portland, OR, for their research on the effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acid deficiency on cognitive and perceptual-motor development in infant monkeys
    • Aug., 1990: to Teresa Wilcox, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, for use in her study on cognitive functioning, and remaining deficits, in healthy, high-functioning preterm infants. 

    As our neurocognitive tasks have become easier to administer, extended visits to our lab have become less and less necessary. I now provide our behavioral tasks (including training videos, detailed testing procedures, the stimulus materials, and the software programs for computerized tests) and extensive consultation on how to administer the tasks and/or how to analyze performance on the tasks to:

    2014 Sara Cordes, PhD, & Ellen Winner, PhD, Profs., Psychology Dept, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, are evaluating the effects of intensive ensemble music training for the development of children's executive functions.
      Tuija Tammelin, Research Director, LIKES Research Center, Finland, to evaluate the effects of physical activity and fitness on children’s cognitive function.
      Cindy Klompmaker-Paans, PhD student, Behavioural Science Institute (Learning and Plasticity / Pedagogy: Learning and Development), Radboud Univ., Nijmegen, Netherlands, for investigating the relation between social and cognitive aspect in children who are learning on the Internet.
      Michael Masucci, graduate research assistant, and Cybele Raver, PhD, Vice Provost for Research and Faculty Affairs, Steinhardt School Institute of Human Development & Social Change, New York Univ., for evaluating the longitudinal effect of poverty risk factors and pre-k behavioral intervention on emotional regulation and executive function.
      Janina Klemm, PhD student, Center of the Learning Sciences, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany, for evaluating the effectiveness of training for observation competency in preschoolers and investigating possible correlations between children’s observation competency and executive functions.
      Julia Hur, PhD student, Management and Organizations Dept, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL, for testing effects of organizational structures on employee's cognitive functions.
      Heidy Ng, undergraduate student, Univ. of Hong Kong, for a study of the relationship between executive function and language development of young Cantonese-English bilingual children.
      Regina Loehndorf, MSc, PhD student, Child and Family Research Centre, Univ.of Leiden, Netherlands, for a longitudinal study investigating the social-emotional and cognitive development of children rom very low SES backgrounds (poverty).
      Nazly Dyer, PhD student, The Dallas Preschool Readiness Project, The Univ. of Texas at Dallas for a large longitudinal study following a sample of low-income African American and Latino children from age 2 1/2 years.
      Patrizia Tortella, Post Doc, Cognitive Sciences and Education, Ca' Foscari University, Venice, Italy, for studies in developing executive functions through motor activity in children.
      Anna Ermakova, PhD student, Dept. of Counselling, Developmental and Educational Psychology, Boston College, MA, for examining the main effect and/or moderating role of executive functions on first graders' ability to learn addition from concrete objects.
      Frank Schilbach, PhD student, & Sendhil Mullainathan, Prof., Dept. of Economics, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA, for a study investigating different aspects associated with poverty -- such as physical pain, malnutrition, excessive alcohol consumption, or sleep deprivation -- affect cognitive function, decision-making, and productivity.
      Daniel Skarlicki, PhD, Edgar F. Kaiser Prof. of Organizational Behaviour, Sauder School of Business, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, for a study examining whether meditation has a relationship with executive functioning and creativity.
      Dario Coletta. MSc, Audiology Candidate, Dept. of Audiology and Speech Science, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, for a study to assess the visual selective attention abilities in children with normal hearing and children with hearing loss.
      Kate Freiberg, PhD, Senior Research Fellow, Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice & Governance, Griffith Univ., Brisbane, Australia, for evaluating the effects of a broad range of child and family support program activities on children's wellbeing.
      Timo Ahonen, Prof. & Noona Kiuru, Adj. Prof, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Jyväskylä, Finland, for a study investigating associations of executive functions to students’ emotional and motivational functioning in learning situations, as well as to broader academic performance, engagement and adjustment.
      Stephan Verschoor, PhD, Ass’t. Prof., Chair of Social and Organisational Psychology, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Germany, for a study measuring executive functioning in 5-year-olds.
      Elaine Kwang Hsia Tham, PhD student, and Ranjani Nadarajan, Neurocognitive Development Centre, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, for a prospective birth cohort study (GUSTO) aiming to assess attention and inhibitory control of children at multiple time points during development.
      Karrie Godwin, PhD student, Psychology Dept., Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, for examining the relationship between attention allocation and learning in preschool and kindergarten children.
      Karsten Schaper, PhD student, Univ. of Education, Freiburg, Germany, for evaluating the effects of different kinds of (acute) physical activity on children´s EFs.
      Nathalie Angeard,. Ass’t. Prof., Dept. of Psychology, U663-INSERM & Paris Descartes Univ., France, for evaluating social cognition and EFs in subjects with the childhood-onset form of Steinert's disease.
      Sally Atkins-Burnett, PhD, Senior Researcher, Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., Washington, DC, for the development of an EF assessment battery for the Middle Grades Longitudinal Study of 2016–17 (MGLS:2017), a project funded by the United States’ National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).
      Andreas Demetriou, PhD, Prof. and President, Univ. of Nicosia Research Foundation, Univ. of Nicosia, Cyprus, for a study on executive control and cognitive flexibility.
      Anne Kær Thorsen, Research Assistant, and Mona Have Sørensen, Scientific Assistant, Dept, of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Univ. of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark, for a school-based randomized controlled trial on adolescents (13-14 year olds) regarding physical activity and cognition.
    2013 Amy Blasberg. Senior Research Analyst, Child Trends, Bethesda, MD, for a system-wide program evaluation of the District of Columbia Public Schools early childhood classrooms to examine the relationship between classroom observational measures and child outcomes.
      Nancie Im-Bolter, PhD, Ass't. Prof., and undergrad student Krista Ross, Dept. of Psychology, Trent Univ., Peterborough, ON, for a study with children 4 - 6 years old.
      Mateusz Orlewicz, research assistant, The Baby and Child Rebel Lab, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, for a project in which A not B task will be replicated.
      Anat Prior, PhD, Lecturer, Faculty of Education, Univ. of Haifa, Israel, for examining the impact of various degrees of bilingualism on EFs in preschoolers and sixth graders.
      Noona Kiuru, PhD, Adj. Prof. and Timo Ahonen, PhD, Prof., Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Jyväskylä, Finland, for a study on Finnish early adolescents (12-13 year olds) investigating associations of EFs to students’ emotional and motivational functioning in learning situations, as well as to their broader academic performance, engagement and adjustment.
      Sidsel Louise Domazet and Mona Have Soerensen, Scientific Assistants, Institute of Sport Sciences and Clinical Biomechanics, Univ. of Southern Denmark, for a school-based randomized controlled trial on adolescents (13-14 year olds) regarding physical activity and cognition.
      Carissa Kang, PhD Student, Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY, for evaluating bilingualism and cognitive advantages on EFs in preschoolers.
      Beth Prado, PhD, Assistant Project Scientist, Program in International and Community Nutrition, UC-Davis, CA, for assessing cognition in 3000 children in Indonesia whose mothers participated in a randomized trial of maternal multiple micronutrient supplementation 10 years ago.
      Spyridoula Vazou, Ass't. Prof, Dept. Kinesiology, Iowa State Univ., Ames, for evaluating the effectiveness of a structured physical activity curriculum on EFs with preschool children.
      Karrie Godwin, PhD student, Dept. of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA, for a study on the relationship between children’s ability to effectively regulate their attention and learning outcomes.
      Jolie Delja, MSc, SEEDS Program, UCLA Semel Institute, Los Angles, CA, for a study of children in a school readiness program.
      Jolie Delja, MSc, SEEDS Program, UCLA Semel Institute, Los Angles, CA, for a study of children in a school readiness program.
      Jelena Obradovic, PhD, Ass't. Prof., School of Education, Stanford Univ., CA, for study of classroom effects on development of EFs in the third and fourth grade students.
      Eve Kikas, PhD, Prof. of School Psychology, Tallinn Univ., Estonia, for a study of children's development and learning evaluating EFs of grade six children.
      Karsten Schaper, PhD student, Univ. of Education, Freiburg, Germany, for evaluating the effects of different kinds of (acute) physical activity on children´s EFs.
      Karen Thierry, PhD, Director of Education Research, Salesmanship Club Youth & Family Centers, Dallas, TX, for evaluating the impact of a mindfulness teacher training program on students' EFs.
      Catalina Santa Cruz, PhD student, Dept. of Psychology, Universidad Católica de Chile, for a study in the relation between different motivational inductions and EFs in 4 to 5 year old Chilean children.
      Claire Goriot, BSc, Master's student, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, NE, for a study explaining variance in EFs in bilingual and monolingual children (approximately 9 years old).
      Rachel Holzwart, Survey Specialist, and Sally Atkins-Burnett, PhD, Senior Researcher, Mathematica Policy Research, Washington, DC, for the assessment of EFs in students for the Middle Grades Longitudinal Study of 2016–17 (MGLS:2017).
      Emily Veith, PhD student, Occupation Therapy, Dominican University of California, San Rafael, CA, for a study of EFs taskin children 3 to 5 years old.
      Tuppett Yates, PhD, Ass't. Prof., Dept. of Psychology, UC-Riverside, CA, for an ongoing study of child representation and regulation among 250 caregiver-child dyads that began at age 4 and is now assessing 9.5 year-olds.
      Nina Attridge, PhD, Centre for Pain Research, Univ. of Bath, UK, for investigating the ways in which pain interferes with attention.
      Rachel Razza, PhD, Ass’t. Prof. of Child and Family Studies, Syracuse Univ., NY, for a study evaluating the effectiveness of a mindful yoga intervention for preschool and kindergarten students.
      Evelien van Wingerden, PhD student, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud Univ., Nijmegen, The Netherlands, in a longitudinal study on the predictors of reading comprehension in children with intellectual disabilities.
    Amanda K. Hutchison MD Psychiatry Resident, Univ. of Colorado Denver for evaluating cognition and executive functioning in 4-6 year olds with mood/attention disorders who also display thought disorder in story-telling.
      Christie Petrenko, Ph.D. Research Associate, Mt. Hope Family Center, Univ. of Rochester. For evaluating the efficacy of a preventive intervention for young children (ages 4-8) with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and their families.
    2012 Fatima Borry, MA student, Dept. of Educational Psychology, Kharazmy Univ., Tehran, Iran, for evaluating the role of EFs and working memory capacity in the reading performance of primary school children.
      David Hegarty, PhD student, Univ. of Sydney, Australia, for a study looking at the impact of cognitive training on the EFs of children 7 - 12 years old.
      Nancie Im-Bolter, PhD, Associate Prof., Dept. of Psychology, Trent Univ., Oshawa, ON, for a longitudinal study with preschoolers.
      Arisleidy Jimenez, PhD student, Inter-American Univ. of Puerto Rico, for a study on preschool children (3 ½ years old).
      Mona Have Sørensen, PhD Fellow, Inst. of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Univ. of Southern Denmark, for evaluating the effect of physical activity as an integrated part of class teaching as well as an individual stimulus outside the classroom on children’s cognitive function.
      Rikke Lambek, PhD, Ass’t. Prof., Dept. of Psychology, University of Aarhus, Denmark, for a study of preschoolers with ADHD.
      Sahragard Fateme, MA student, Kharazmi Univ., Tehran, Iran, for a study to investigate the developmental relations between theory of mind and EF.
      Christos Symeonides, PhD candidate, Environmental & Genetic Epidemiology Group, Murdoch Children's Research Inst., Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Australia, for a study of environmental exposure to modern industrial chemicals and early childhood neurodevelopment within an unselected birth cohort study, with a particular focus upon EFs and memory.
      Limor Rosenberg, PhD, Dept. of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv Univ., Israel, for a study pf associations between a child's participation in daily activities and EFs.
      Carmen Campbell, PhD, Prof. Univ. Católica de Brasília, for a study with children in Brazil.
      Paulo A. Graziano, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Children and Families, Florida International Univ., Miami, for a study investigating the extent to which a summer intervention improves preschoolers with externalizing behavior problems’ self-regulation skills.
    Flora Koutsandréou, PhD student, Univ. of Paderborn, Germany, for the evaluation of the relationship between coordination training and cognitive functions.
      Eva Michel, PhD, Psychology Dept., Univ. of Wuerzburg, Germany, for investigating the development of EFs and motor coordination in children at risk for developmental coordination disorders.
      Joep van der Graaf, PhD student, Behavioural Science Institute: Learning and Plasticity / Pedagogy: Learning and Development, Radboud Univ. Nijmegen, Netherlands, for explaining variance in the learning behaviour in young children (4-7 years).
      Adi Marom, grad student of Prof. Pnina Klien, Child Development Dept., Bar Ilan University, Israel, for a study of EFs, language and immigrant children
      Julie Poehlmann, PhD, Prof. & Abra Bankendorf Vigna, Project Ass't., Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, for a study evaluating the potential impact of a contemplative practices intervention on the self-regulation skills of high-risk preschoolers.
      Betul Mazlum. MD/PhD Student, Dept. of Neuroscience, Istanbul Univ., Turkey, for a study on the cognitive profiles of children with Down Syndrome.
      Vanna (Ioanna) Cotzia, PhD student, Educational and Child Psychology, University College London, for a study investigating the effects of social power on cognitive processing and moral reasoning in preschoolers.
      Jessica Love, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, Psychology Dept., Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, to see if individual differences in EF control mediate performance in a language processing task that requires children to recover from garden-path sentences.
      Tanya Denmark, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, & Joanna Atkinson, PhD, Clinical Psychologist/Senior Researcher, Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre, Univ. College London, UK, for a study looking at EFs over the lifespan of deaf individuals: specifically, children aged between 5-11, adults and older adults.
      Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal, PhD, Associate Prof., Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA, for a study examining associations between school readiness and instruction and socialization practices in community-based pre-K classrooms that serve primarily low-income children.
      Spyridoula Vazou, PhD, Ass't. Prof., Dept. of Kinesiology, Iowa State Univ., Ames, for a study on the role of integrated physical activity on motivation, affect and EFs in 4th graders.
      Cynthia Fisher, PhD, Prof., Psychology Dept., Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, for a study of online syntactic ambiguity resolution in 5-year-olds' sentence comprehension.
      Betul Mazlum, MD/PhD Student, Dept. of Neuroscience, Istanbul Univ., Turkey, for a study on the cognitive profiles of children with Down Syndrome.
      Marinus Van IJzendoorn, PhD, Prof. & Maike Malda, PhD student, Child and Family Studies, Leiden Univ., Netherlands, in collaboration with Birgit Leyendecker, PhD, Prof., Ruhr Univ. Bochum, Germany & Brit Oppendal, PhD, Senior Researcher, Division of Mental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway, for a study of the development of Turkish immigrant children in the Netherlands, Germany, and Norway.
      Maike Malda, PhD, Post Doc, Child and Family Studies, Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, Leiden Univ., Netherlands, for a study of the development of Turkish immigrant children in the Netherlands, Germany, and Norway.
    Rikke Lambek, PhD, Ass't. Prof, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Aarhus, Denmark, for a study of preschool children (3-6) with ADHD.
      Alice Carter, PhD, Prof., Dept. of Psychology, Univ.of Massachusetts-Boston, for a study on trauma exposure in pre-schoolers.
      Tanya Denmark, PhD, Post Doc, Deafness Cognition and Language Research Centre, Univ. College London, UK, for a study looking at EFs over the lifespan of deaf individuals.
      Eduardo Bustamante, PhD student, Dept. of Kinesiology and Nutrition. Exercise Psychology Lab. Univ. of Illinois, Chicago for a study of aerobic activity as an intervention for children with ADHD and Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBD).
      Arjan van Tilborg, PhD student, Dept. of Learning and Plasticity, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud Univ., Nijmegen, Netherlands, for a study measuring EFs in children with an intellectual disability and severe language impairments.
      Marie Geurten, PhD student, Psychology Dept. (Cognition & Behaviour) Univ. of Liège, Belgium, for evaluating the impact of EFs on meta-memory development in young to older children.
      Amy Medina, MA student. (reasearch ass't in the lab of Dr. Tracy Dennis), Emotion Regulation Lab, Dept. of Psychology, Hunter College, NYC, for a study of Event-Related Potentials and EFs in school-aged children.
      Yi-Yuan Tang, PhD, Prof. and Director, Texas Tech Neuroimaging Institute (TTNI), Dept of Psychology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX for preparing a small grant application for EF intervention in children 6-7 years old.
      Eva van de Sande, PhD Student, Behavioural Science Inst., Radboud Univ. of Nijmegen, Netherlands, for investigating the interrelations of EFs and literacy in early development, and how they can be playfully trained together in kindergartners.
      Bryan J. Matlen, PhD Student, Dept. of Psychology, Program for Interdisciplinary Education Research, Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center, Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA, for a longitudinal study examining the development of category-based reasoning in 4 year old children.
    2011 Kimberley Lakes, PhD, Ass't. Prof., Dept. of Pediatrics, School of Medicine: & Co-Director, Community Engagement Unit, Institute for Clinical and Translational Science; Univ. of California, Irvine, on her research on the benefits of traditional Taekwondo for EFs and academic performance of school children.
      Monica Tsethlikai, PhD, Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, on her research on how variations in environmental stressors, on the one hand, and cultural support and engagement, on the other, impact the development of EFs in two Native American tribes, the Tohono O’odham Nation and the Blackfeet Nation.
      Spyridoula Vazou, Ass't. Prof., Dept. of Kinesiology, Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, for evaluating the effectiveness of integrated physical activity with math practice for improving students’ (4th grade) EFs and affect in a controlled lab setting.
      Blandine Hubert, PhD student in Developmental Psychology, Centre de Recherche en Education, Université de Nantes, France, for work on inhibition, interpersonal relations, social skills and academic skills with children in kindergarten and Grade 1.
      Lydia Krabbendam, PhD, Prof. of Educational Neuropsychology, Free Univ., Amsterdam, NE, for a study of families to investigate how cognitive flexibility and inhibition in parents and their children influences interpersonal relationships.
      Diana Giraldo Arango, MD, Univ. of San Buenaventura, Bogotá, Colombia, for a study to stimulate EFs in preschool children.
      Renata Vaysman, Clinical Psychology PhD Student, Child Clinical & Developmental Lab., Univ. at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY, for a study using Luria's Tapping Test.
      Adena Portowitz, PhD, School of Education, Bar Ilan University, Israel, for studying the underlying mechanisms linking mediated music lessons and language proficiency among kindergarten children of foreign workers.
      Ingunn Størksen, PhD, Universitetet i Stravanger, Norway, for a study of young children as they transfer from Norwegian daycare centers into school.
      Elizabeth Willis, PhD student in Curriculum & Instruction at Florida International Univ., University Park, Florida, for evaluating the effectiveness of the Word of Wisdom Meditation Technique on the development of children's self-regulation skills for ages 4-9.
    Christine Coughlin, PhD student, Center for Mind and Brain, UC-Davis, CA, for examining early metacognition in children ages 3-5.
    Tracy Solomon, PhD, Developmental Psychologist and Research Scientist, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, for studying the effectiveness of Tools of the Mind in preschools.
    Leslie F. Halpern, PhD, Ass't. Prof., Dept. of Psychology, Univ.at Albany, SUNY, Albany, NY, for testing a literacy and EF intervention for preschool children in Head Start.
    Tamar Mendelson, Ass’t. Prof., Dept. of Mental Health, School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD, for evaluating the impact of a 12-week school-based yoga program on EFs in 5th and 6th graders in Baltimore City public schools.
      Ann M. Digirolamo, PhD, MPH, Senior Technical Advisor, Early Childhood Development and HIV/Aids, Atlanta, GA, for use in measuring EFs in children 5 years of age.
      Adena Portowitz, PhD, School of Education, Bar Ilan Univ., Israel, for studying the underlying mechanisms linking mediated music lessons and language proficiency among kindergarten children of foreign workers.
      Rachel Flynn. PhD Student, Univ. of California, Riverside, for evaluating the acute effects of physically active versus inactive video game play on executive function skills in children.
      Anthony Byers, PhD Student, Univ. of Virginia, VA, for a study testing the restorative environment hypothesis with young children.
      Radhika Bapat, Founder & Director of the Child Guidance Clinic, Sahyadri Specialty Hospital, Pune, India, to assess the EF needs of children across a wide age range and to assess intervention efficacy.
      Rodrigo Azuero Melo, Research Assistant, Inter-American Development Bank, WA, to assess the impact of an early child development program in Rio de Janeiro for children 1-7 years old on the development of executive functions.
      Rachel Montague, MA Student, Dept. of Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific Univ., WA, for a study with 3- to 6-year-old children with high functioning autism.
      Charmaine Miranda, PhD, Registered Psychologist, Vancouver, BC, for conducting assessments of children with ADHD and FASD
      Sabrina Wiebe, PhD Student, Douglas Research Center, Montreal, QC, for examining executive functions in toddlers.
      Joy Pieper, PhD Student, Univ. of California-Davis, Davis, CA, for comparing EFs and eating/activity behaviors in preschool children (ages 3-5).
      Angela Lee Duckworth, PhD, Ass’t Prof., Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Pennsylvania, PA, for a Tools of the Mind random-assignment study in Chile.
      Patrice Engle, PhD, Prof., Dept. of Psychology and Child Development, California Poly. State Univ. San Luis Obispo, CA.
      Rebecca Williamson, PhD, Ass’t Prof., Psychology Dept., Georgia State Univ., Atlanta, GA.
      Rachel Schiff, PhD, Head of the Haddad Center for Dyslexia and Learning Disability, Bar-Ilan Univ., Ramat-Gan, Israel, for improving the available diagnostic tools at the Center and aiding the development of training programs.
      Adelle Pushparatnam, PhD Student, Univ. of Cambridge, UK, for evaluating the relationship between parents’ perceived importance of behaviors related to theory of mind and children’s development of theory of mind in autism spectrum disorders using a cross-cultural perspective.
      Stephane Nave, MD, Clinical Science Leader, Translational Medicine, Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland, for exploratory research in adult and children with Down Syndrome using cognitive tasks to measure inhibitory control.
      Susan Menkes, PhD Student, Applied Developmental Psychology, Claremont Graduate Univ., Claremont, CA, for examining the relationship between EF abilities and media platform on children’s media comprehension.
    2010 Ann M. Digirolamo, PhD, MPH, Senior Technical Advisor, Early Childhood Development and HIV/Aids, Atlanta, GA, for use in measuring EFs in children 5 years of age.
      Rebecca Williamson, PhD., Ass’t Prof. Dept. of Psychology, Georgia State Univ.
      Nathalie Angeard, Ass’t Prof., Developmental Neuropsychology Group, INSERM U 663 & Paris Descartes University, Paris, France, for evaluating the links between EFs and theory of mind impairments in children with cardiac malformations.
      Lindsey Richland, PhD, Ass't Prof., Education Dept., UC-Irvine, CA, for evaluating the role of EFs in analogical reasoning development, and for evaluating individual differences in learning from a game-based software for teaching classroom mathematics.
      Adena Portowitz, PhD, School of Education, Bar Ilan Univ., Israel, for evaluating the impact of music lessons on the development of EFs among kindergarten children of foreign workers living in Israel.
      Esther S. Ginsberg, PhD Student, Monash Univ., Australia, assessing ocular motor performance in Fragile X Syndrome and autistic male participants.
      Anna Shusterman, PhD, Ass't. Prof., Psychology Dept, & Julia Leonard, research assistant, Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT, for use in a study focusing on delay of gratification in children ages 4 to 5.
      Sara Wheeler, PhD Student, Inst. for Human Development, UC-Berkeley, CA, for evaluating EFs in a study of emergent literacy in preschool children.
      Christine Coughlin, PhD Student, Dept. of Psychology & Centre for Mind and Brain, UC-Davis, CA, for use in a series of studies examining early metacognition in children ages 3 to 5.
      Willem Bossers, PhD Student, Human Movement Sciences, Univ. of Groningen, Netherlands, for investigating the effects of an exercise program on cognition in older people with dementia.
      Suzanne Houwen, PhD, & Esther Hartman, PhD., Center for Human Movement Sciences, Univ., of Groningen, The Netherlands, for investigating the impact of physical activity during academic lessons on EFs and academic achievement in primary school with focus on challenged children.
      Brian M. Galla, PhD Student, School of Ed. & Information Studies, UC-Los Angeles, CA, for examining the effectiveness of mindfulness training in promoting EFs in high poverty adolescents ages 11 to 13.
      Alison Parker, PhD, Res. Assoc., Innovation Research & Training, Durham, NC, for evaluating the effectiveness of a mindfulness-based substance abuse prevention program on 4th and 5th grade student outcomes, including attention, EF, coping, and affect.
      Susan Menkes, PhD Student, Applied Developmental Psychology, Claremont Graduate Univ., CA, Claremont, CA, for evaluating the influence of executive functioning skills on children's comprehension of media/story content across different platforms (i.e., television, computer, and touchscreen technology).
      Rikin Patel, Pediatrics Resident, Janeway Children's Health & Rehabilitation Centre, St. John's, NL, for evaluating the benefits of Kung Fu, looking at both clinical and psychological markers.
      Carla Maria Carmona, PhD, Clinical Psychologist, Dept. of Genetics, Saúde Doutor Ricardo Jorge National Inst., Portugal, for evaluating EFs and other cognitive abilities in patients with PKU.
      Alessandra Gotuzo Seabra, PhD, Prof., Developmental Disorders Dept., Mackenzie Univ., Brazil, for evaluating the effectiveness of EFs and self-regulation interventions on academic and social outcomes in preschoolers.
      Roberta Golinkoff, PhD, H. Rodney Sharp Prof., Sch. of Education & Depts. of Psychology and Linguistics & Cog. Science, Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE, for evaluating the benefits of play for EFs development in 4-year-old, low SES children.
      Paul Skirrow, D. Clin. Psy., Clinical Psychologist, Learning Disabilities Service, Mossley Hill Hospital, Liverpool, UK, for use in an assessment battery for evaluating the presence of dementias and other neurological conditions in adults with global intellectual disabilities who have limited verbal language.
      María Luisa García Gomar, PhD Student, Psychology Dept. & Neurobiology Inst., Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico City, for studying the neurodevelopment of working memory in infants and toddlers.
      Rachel Weber, PhD Student, School Psychology Dept., Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX, for studying bilingual and monolingual Spanish-English speaking kindergartners.
      Olivia Spiegler, PhD Student, & Birgit Leyendecker, PhD, Researcher, Psychology Dept., Ruhr Univ. Bochum, Germany, for assessing children’s executive functions in the pretest of the NUBBEK study in Germany (National Study on Children’s Education and Development in the pre-school years).
      Angela Duckworth, PhD, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Penn., Philadelphia, PA, for use in assessing the efficacy of a school curriculum intervention to improve self-control in school-age children.
      Eva van de Sande, PhD Student, Behavioural Science Inst., Radboud Univ. of Nijmegen, Netherlands, for investigating the development and interaction of executive functions and early literacy skills in young children.
      Mariana Maia Portoccarrero, student, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Univ. of Coimbra, Portugal, for studying the efficacy and effectiveness of the Tools of the Mind program.
      Kristen Spencer, PhD Student, Psychology Dept., Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL, for comparing executive function performance across tasks.
      Ronnie Weinberger, MA Student, Behavioral Neurogenetics Center, Schneider Children's Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel, for testing executive functions in adolescents with ADHD studying in a special-needs school.
      Lex Wijnroks, Senior Lecturer, Utrecht University, Netherlands, for assessing executive functions in preterm children ages 5 & 6, and how predictive early achievements on the delayed response task is of executive functions 5 years later.
      Isabella Hild, PhD student, Inst. for Psychology, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany, for evaluating executive functions and training of executive functions in persons who are illiterate.
      Kang Lee, Prof. & Director; Heidi Gordon, Postdoc; and Megan Brunet, PhD Student, Inst. of Child Study, Univ. of Toronto, ON, for examining the relation between children's secret-keeping and lie-telling behaviors, and their executive functioning.
      Feggy Ostrosky, Prof. & Head of Neuropsychology Lab, National Univ. of Mexico, Mexico City, for studying the effectiveness in improving executive functions of (a) two training programs for preschool children and (b) a parent-child interaction program.
    2009 Jessica Willard, Dept. of Developmental Psychology, Univ. of Bochum, Bochum, Germany, for studying social integration of migrant children, uncovering family and school factors promoting resilience in 5-15 year old children
      Clyde Hertzman, PhD, HELP (Human Early Learning Project), Vancouver, BC, for assessing executive functions in the GECKO Project (Gene Expression Collaborative for Kids Only)
      Lex Wijnroks, Senior Lecturer and Researcher, Utrecht University, Netherlands, to study memory, task switching, and inhibition in 5 to 6 year olds.
      Zvia Breznitz, PhD, Head, & Ronnie Weinberger, Res. Ass’t, Center of Brain & Behavior Research, Univ. of Haifa, Israel, for testing executive functions in adolescents with ADHD studying in a special-needs school.
      Suncica Lah, PhD, Senior Lecturer, Clinical Neuropsychologist, School of Psychology, Univ. of Sydney, Australia, for a study of executive functions in children who have sustained traumatic brain injuries prior to starting school.
      Lisa Flook, PhD & Richard Davidson, PhD, Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, Waisman Lab for Brain Imaging & Behavior, Univ. of Wisc.-Madison, WI, for evaluating the effectiveness of mindfulness & lovingkindness training in educational settings on attention regulation in preschool & elementary-school children.
      Birgit Leyendecker, PhD, & Arno Mueller, Dept. of Psychology, Ruhr Univ., Bochum, Germany , to develop a pre-intervention measures for the NUBBEK study (National Study on Children’s Education and Development in the pre-school years) in Germany to assess children’s executive functions.
      Susan Carey, Prof.; Deborah Zaitchik, PhD; & Yeshim Iqba, Dept. of Psychology, Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA, for studying the relation between executive functions & the development of biological concepts & conceptual change.
      Alain Berthoz, Prof., Collège de France, Paris, & Dr. Giovanni Cioni, Pisa, Italy, to investigate possible executive function deficits in children with cerebral palsy.
      Dr. Dana Tal Jacobi, Tel Hashomer Hospital, Israel, for a study of executive functions in children who had brain tumors in their posterior fossa.
      Rachel Weber, PhD candidate, School Psychology Program, Texas A&M Univ., College Station, TX, for a study of executive functions in bilingual and monolingual Spanish-English speaking kindergartners.
      Zeynep Gültekin, PhD candidate, Educational Psychology, Ankara Univ., Turkey, for studying maternal scaffolding and development of hot and cold executive functions in 3- to 5-year-olds.
      Karin Brocki, Postdoc, Dept. of Psychology, Uppsala Univ., Sweden, for studying the structure and interrelations among components of executive functions in children between 5-13 years of age.
      Tracey Fay-Stammbach, PhD Student, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Univ. of Queensland, Australia, to explore if parental attachment, organization of home routines, and the provision of child enrichment opportunities are associated with the emergence of self-regulatory (executive control) skills during the preschool years.
      Caroline Kleeman, undergraduate in the lab of Monique Lebourgeois, PhD, Brown Univ., RI, to study how sleep and sleep deprivation affect cognitive abilities in young children.
      Shinmin Wang, PhD student, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of York, UK, for a study investigating executive functions profiles in children with reading difficulties.
      Meghan McCormick, Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation (MDRC), New York City, NY, , for executive function assessments of 1,000’s of children (3½-8½ years old) whose parents are participating in the Supporting Healthy Marriage Demonstration and Evaluation trial.
      Isabelle Amado, MD, Marie Odile, PhD, & Térèse Jay, INSERM, Hospital Sainte Anne, Paris, for a study on ADHD, the prodromal symptoms of psychosis, and infants with pervasive development disorders.
      Bev Wilson, Prof., Dept. of Clinical Psychology, Seattle Pacific Univ., Seattle, WA, for a study with 3- to 6-year-old children with high functioning autism, Seattle, WA.
      Tamar Mendelson, Ass’t. Prof., Dept. of Mental Health, School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD, for evaluating the impact of a 12-week school-based yoga program on EFs in 5th and 6th graders in Baltimore City public schools.
      Anat Prior, PhD, Lecturer, Dept. of Learning Disabilities, Univ. of Haifa, Israel, for evaluating the cognitive consequences of bilingualism for executive functions in two populations of balanced and less-balanced Russian-Hebrew bilingual preschoolers compared to monolingual peers.
      Brian M. Galla, PhD student, Education Dept., UC-Los Angeles, CA, for evaluating the effectiveness in promoting executive functions of a mindfulness-based skills training program.
      Jaswinder Ghuman, MD, Assoc. Prof., Univ. of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, for evaluating a pilot pharmacological study in preschool children with ADHD to assess if inhibitory control measures and electrophysiological measures can be used to study the efficacy of atomoxetine (stratera) treatment.
      Prof. Wendy Thornton, Prof. Daniel Bernstein, Alisha Coolin, & Ashley Fischer, Clinical Psychology PhD students, Simon Fraser Univ., Vancouver, BC, for examining the relations among executive functioning, hindsight bias, and theory of mind throughout the lifespan.
      Kim Cornish, Prof., & Jacalyn Guy, PhD student, McGill Univ., Montreal, QC, for a study of the development of response inhibition across visual and auditory modalities in preschool children.
      Tom Boyce, MD, Prof., & Jelena Obradovic, Postdoc, Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP), UBC, Vancouver, BC, for studying how social disparities contribute to epigenetic modifications & neurodevelopmental vulnerability, including in executive functioning.
      Tim Oberlander, MD, Assoc. Prof., & Ursula Brain, Research Manager, Dept. of Pediatrics, UBC & BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, for measuring executive function longitudinally from early childhood in children who mothers were depressed and who were or were not exposed to anti-depressants (SSRIs) in utero.
      Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, PhD, and staff (Molly Lawlor, Ahmed Rahim, Eva Oberle, Kim Thompson, Paula Andrews, Crystal McLennan, Anne Gadermann, & Angela Jaramillo), Dept. of Educational and Counseling Psychology, UBC, Vancouver, BC, to investigate the effect of in-school mindfulness training on the development of social-emotional and cognitive regulation in elementary- school age children.
    2008 Mitchell Schertz, MD, Director, Institute for Child Development, Herzeliya, Israel, for research use in a community clinic for children with preschool ADHD symptomatology.
      Kim Bishop, PhD, Principal Consultant, Global Pharma Consultancy,LLC, Muncy, PA, for use in an Alzheimer’s Disease clinical trial.
      Gail Ross, Assoc. Prof., Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York City, NY, for a study on whether children of mothers with lupus display abnormalities of cortical function.
      Steve Hughes, PhD, Ass’t. Prof. of Pediatrics, Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, for evaluating the effects of classical Montessori education on EFs and other aspects of cognitive development.
      Jie He, Dept. of Psychology & Behavioral Sciences, Zhejiang Univ., China, for a study of angry youngsters’ executive functioning.
      Prof. Gary Evans & M arianella Casasola, Human Dev., Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY, for studying the potential role of the intersection of socioemotional and cognitive processes during early childhood in the etiology of the income-achievement gap.
      Robert Roeser, Assoc. Prof., Psychology Dept., Portland State Univ., Portland, OR, for evaluating the effectiveness of meditative, stress-reduction training of teachers on student outcomes, such as students’ executive functions.
      Tom Boyce, MD, Prof., & Jelena Obradovic, Postdoctoral Fellow, Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP), UBC, Vancouver, BC, for studying epigenetic modifications & social disparities in neurodevelopmental vulnerability.
      Prof. Sebastián Lipina, Unidad de Neurobiología Aplicada (UNA) (CEMIC-CONICET), Buenos Aires, Argentina, for executive function measures to assess the effects of poverty and of interventions to alleviate it.
      Greg Lewis & Stephen Porges, Director, Brain-Body Center, Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL,for use in a comprehensive, portable neurophysiological assessment being ported to clinical settings to study cognitive and affective features of post-traumatic stress disorder, autism, & other psychiatric disorders.
      Prof. Penny Hauser-Cram & Ashley Woodman, Counseling, Developmental, & Educational Psychology Dept., Boston College, MA, for an ongoing longitudinal investigation of children with developmental disabilities and their families.
      Akram Ahangi, MA, Dept. of Psychology, Iran, for a study of color/object Stroop interference in Iranian children ages 3-6.
      Brian Galla, MA, School of Ed. & Information Studies, UC-Los Angeles, CA, for examining the effectiveness of a mindfulness training in promoting executive functions.
      Alain Berthoz, PhD, Chair of Physiology of Perception & Action, College de France, Paris, for examining executive functions in children between 4-5 to 16 years of age in Pisa, Italy (with Prof. Giovani Cioni).
      Justin Wise, PhD, Dept. of Psychology, Georgia State Univ., GA, for examining executive functions in children between 4-6 years of age, looking at white matter integrity of prefrontal cortex in children with obstructive sleep apnea pre- and post-surgical treatment relative to typically developing children.
      Karen Penner, PhD student, Univ. of Manitoba, for assessing executive functions and higher-level visual perceptual skills in 4-year-old formerly high-risk infants.
      Jamie Edgin, PhD & Lynn Nadel, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, for the development of a neuropsychological battery for children with Down syndrome.
      Janean E'guya Dilworth-Bart, PhD, Dept. of Human Development and Family Studies, School of Human Ecology, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, for a study on urban preschoolers at high sociodemographic risk.
      Ruth Grunau, PhD, Janet Kidd, Ivan Cepeda, & Sarah Duncanson, Child & Family Research Institute, BC Children's & Women's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, for a study on the cognitive abilities of children born pre-term.
      Kathryn Lombardi, PhD student, Dept. of Psychology, Suffolk Univ., Boston, MA, for a study of the effects of dopamine levels in an aging population.
      Jane Appleby, PhD student, Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, School of Psychology, Univ. of Birmingham, UK, for a study on the learning disabilities associated with Rubinstein Taybi Syndrome and Cri du Chat Syndrome.
      Maartje Raijmakers, PhD, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Amsterdam, Netherlands, for use in studying the Dimensional Change Card Sort task.
      Robert Pianta, PhD & Jason Downer, PhD, Center for Advanced Study of Teaching and Learning, Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, for a study of the effects of teachers’ behavior (e.g., warmth, feedback, management) on children’s socioemotional and academic progress during children’s early years.
      Dennis Molfese, PhD, Developmental Neuroscience Lab, Univ. of Louisville, KY, for a study on the effects of sleep restriction in children.
      Karin Brocki, PhD, Developmental Imaging-Genetics, Mt. Sinai Sch. of Medicine, New York City, NY, continued help in training and verifying accurate administration of our tasks for her study investigating ADHD children’s performance on dopamine-dependent & dopamine-independent tasks.
      Tim Oberlander, MD, Dept. of Pediatrics, UBC, & Ursula Brain, Research Manager, Healthy Starts Program, Centre for Community Child Health Research, Vancouver, BC, for measures of executive function with young children who were exposed to anti-depressants (SSRIs) in utero.
      Julie Rusyniak, Juliana Mesa, Devin Carey, & Martyna Galazka, Kennedy Krieger Inst., Baltimore, MD, for investigating the effects of physical connectedness in aiding the grasp of conceptual connections in children with autism.
      Angela Duckworth, PhD, Dept. of Psychology, Univ. of Penn., Philadelphia, PA, for use in assessing the efficacy of a school curriculum intervention to improve self-control in school-age children.
      Doron Gothelf, MD, Tel Aviv Univ., Israel, for a study of executive function deficits in children with velocardiofacial syndrome (22q11.2 deletion syndrome) depending on their COMT genotype.
      Deborah Dewey, PhD, Depts. of Pediatrics, Kinesiology, & Psychology, Univ. of Calgary & Alberta Children's Hospital, for a study of executive function deficits in children with developmental motor delays.
      Alessandra Geraci, PhD student, Dept. of Cognitive Sciences and Education, Rovereto, Italy, for a measure of inhibitory control in children.
      Phyllis Zelkowitz, EdD, & Sumin Na, Research Assistant, Inst. of Community and Family Psychiatry, Sir Mortimer B Davis Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, for a study on the long-term effects of intervention on the cognitive development of children born prematurely to women affected by post-partum depression.
      Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, PhD, and staff (Molly Lawlor, Ahmed Rahim, Eva Oberle, Kim Thompson, Paula Andrews, Crystal McLennan, Anne Gadermann, & Angela Jaramillo), Dept. of Educational and Counseling Psychology, UBC, Vancouver, BC, to investigate the effect of in-school mindfulness training on the development of social-emotional and cognitive regulation in school-age children.

    2007 and earlier: - click here.

    We continue to develop sensitive behavioral assays of the different cognitive abilities that comprise EF, to freely share those, and to provide training in administering those tasks free of charge to researchers around the world.

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Memberships

Membership on university committees

Member, Departmental Advisory Committee, Psychiatry Department, UBC (2012 – present)

Member, the Canada Research Chair (CRC) Internal Review Committee of UBC (2006 - 2014)

Member-at-Large, Executive Committee, UBC Faculty Association (2008-2010)

Member. Membership Committee, Green College, UBC (2007-2009)

Member, Research Administration Committee, Div. of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Dept. of Psychiatry (2005 - 2009)

Member, Search Committee for Leadership Chair in Child Psychiatry (2009)

Member, Search Committee for Leadership Chair in Child Psychiatry (2006)

Member, Canada Research Chair Tier II Review Committee, Faculty of Medicine, UBC (2005)

Member, Faculty Search Committee, Brain Research Centre, for a CRC Professor in Neuroimaging (2004 - 2005)

Memberships on scholarly Boards

Current

 

  • Board member of the NSF proposal Alberto G. Rojo, Dept. of Physics, Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI, is producing called: "La Experiencia Dorada:A Video Series on Science and Art", targeted to Latino parents (2014 – present)
  • Member, Bronfenbrenner and G. Stanley Hall Award Committees (2014 – present)
  • Member, Expert member on the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 2010-11 (ECLS-K:2011) Technical Review Panel (2014 – present)
  • Member, Lincos Advisory Committee - a non-profit applied think tank working on improving children's capacity for learning in vulnerable areas of Peru (2013 – present)
  • Member, Advisory Group for the Bezos Family Foundation and the Families and Work Institute: for a campaign to disseminate cutting-edge advances in neuroscience and child development in engaging ways (2013 - present)
  • Member, Conference Advisory Committee, Development 2014, A Canadian Conference on Developmental Psychology (2013 – 2014)
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Group for Start2Finish, Burlington, ON (2012 - present)
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Committee for L-­rn , where L_rn experts offered a comprehensive look at a host of topics around child development (2011 - 2012)
  • Member, Content Review Panel (CRP) for Phase II of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, reviewing and providing guidance on the EF measures proposed for the first and second grade data collections. National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) (2011 - present)
  • Member, External Advisory Board, Project proposal on “the neural and cognitive effects of poverty on very young children,” PI: Hallam Hurt, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (2010 - present)
  • Member, Distinguished Scientific Advisory Board, The Ultimate Block Party, NYC, NY (2010 - present)
    The Ultimate Block Party is “a non-profit organization founded and designed by a coalition of leading educators, scientists and cultural leaders to put play at the forefront of children’s lives as a critical factor in the development of 21st century skills.”
  • Member, Advisory Board, the Sage School, Hailey, Idaho (2010 - present)
  • Member, Honorary Board, KidCareCanada Society, Victoria, BC (2010 - present)
  • Member, Advisory Board, NeuroDevNet, Canadian Network of Centres of Excellence (NCE) dedicated to helping children overcome neurodevelopmental disorders (2010 - present)
  • Member, Advisory Board, Child Guidance Clinic, Pune, India (2010 - present)
  • Member, Advisory Board, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research and Collaboration in Autism (CIRCA), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (2010 - present )
  • Member , Conference Advisory Committee, Development 2010, A Canadian Conference on Developmental Psychology (2010)
  • Member, Child Neurosciences Research Group (CNRG) within the Neurons to Neighbourhoods Cluster of the Child & Family Research Institute (CFRI) (2009 - present)
  • Member, NSF Outside Advisory Board member for a 3-year $950,000 NSF award directed toward using the ECLS-K and ECLS-B to explore the role of factors present prior to school entry that might predict math and science scores at 3rd, 5th and 8th grade. PI: David Grissmer (2009 - 2011)
  • Member, Steering Committee of Early Childhood Interventions Subgroup of the Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group (headed by Nobel Laureate, James Heckman) to foster high-level interaction and collaborations among economists and psychologists. (2008 - present)
  • Member, Research Management Committee of the Down Syndrome Research Foundation (2007 - present)
  • Member, International Research Network on Imagination and Education (2006 - present )
  • Member, Leadership Council, Contemplative Teaching and Learning Initiative, Garrison Institute (2006 - present )
  • Nominator, MacArthur Fellows Program (2004 - present)
  • Member, Senior Advisory Board, National Center for Developmental Sci. in the Public Interest, (2001 - present)
  • Member, ‘Faculty of 1000’, Its principal aim is to organize and evaluate the vast life sciences literature. In the Faculty of 1000 the entire field of biology is divided into 17 Faculties. I am in the Cognitive Neuroscience section headed by Richard Morris and Leslie Ungerleider, which is within the Neuroscience Faculty headed by Martin Raff, Chuck Stevens, Bill Newsome, and Carla Shatz. (2001 - present)
  • Member, College of Reviewers for the Canada Research Chairs program (a tri-granting-council program of the Government of Canada), (2001 - present )
  • Member, National Scientific Advisory Committee, Program Project Grant on "Somatic Cell Genetic Studies of Down Syndrome, "Denver University & Univ. of Colorado, (1997 - present)
  • Member, External Advisory Committee, Learning Disabilities Research Center, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University, (1995 - present)
  • Member, Scientific Advisory Board, Family Life Project, Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (2006-2012)
  • Member, External evaluator of Chandan J. Vaidya who is seeking promotion to full professor, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (2012)
  • Member, External Advisory Board, Neuroimaging Institute, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (2012)

Recent Past

  • Member, Board of Governors of the International Neuropsychological Society (INS) (2005-2008)
  • Member, Executive Governing Board, Cognitive Development Society (2003-2010)
  • Member, Local organizing committee for Canadian Association for Neuroscience Annual Meeting in Vancouver (2008 - 2009)
  • Member, Fellows Committee of Division 7 (Developmental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association (2004 - 2008)
  • Member, Selection Committee for the Eleanor Maccoby Book Award (2005)
  • Program Advisor, PBS series proposal on the emotional lives of girls (2004 - 2005)
  • Member, Selection Committee for winner of the McGuigan Prize of APA (2004)
  • Member, External Advisory Committee, Program Project Grant on "Development of Arousal & Attention Regulation,” PI: Judith Gardner, NYS Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities
  • Member, NSF Grant Advisory Panel for Human Cognition and Perception, (2000)
  • Member, Panel on "Perception, Attention, and Memory" for the McDonnell Foundation, Sackler
  • Member, Foundation Initiative on Centers on Human Brain Development, (1998-2000)
  • Member, NIH Site Visit Teams, (1996, 1997, 1999, 2003, 2004)
  • Member, international scientific committee that planned the Congress in Geneva on "The Growing Mind: Interdisciplinary Approaches" on the centennial of Piaget's birth in 1996.
  • Member, NIH Study Section, Human Development & Aging-1 (AHR), (1991 )

Editorships

  • Theme Editor, Executive Functioning in Perspectives on Language and Literacy, (2014)

  • Associate Editor, Developmental Psychology (2004-2010)
  • Editor, special issue of Developmental Psychology on the Interplay of Biology and Environment broadly defined, targeting papers with the potential to change or challenge how developmental psychologists think. Topics include: How Experience affects Mind, Brain, and Gene Expression throughout Development; Genetic Mediation of Environmental Effects on Mind and Body during Development; Interrelations between Physical Health and Mental Health during Development; How Emotions Affect Brain Function (and hence Cognition and Perception) during Development (issue appeared in Jan., 2009)
  • Associate Editor, Developmental Science (2001- )

Member of Editorial Boards:

  • Child Development
  • Cognitive Development
  • Developmental Neuropsychology
  • Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  • Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology
  • Journal of the International Neuropsychological Soc
  • Neurocase
  • Neuropsychologia
  • Research on Early Education and Child Health
  • Trends in Neuroscience and Education

Past Member of Editorial Boards:

  • Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, served 2005-2009
  • Developmental Neuropsychology, served 2003-2008
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences, served 2003-2006
  • Infant Behavior and Development, served 1994-2004
  • Developmental Psychobiology, served 1994-2000
  • Infancy, served from its inception - 2003
  • Brain and Mind, served from its inception - 2003

Memberships in scholarly societies - click here.

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